- The Washington Times - Friday, January 27, 2006

Wayne Bloomingburg, a longtime Arlington teacher and church leader, died Jan. 17 of cancer at his Arlington home. He was 81.

Born July 8, 1924, in Arlington, Mr. Bloomingburg graduated from Washington-Lee High School and attended Freed-Hardeman College in Henderson, Tenn.

He received his bachelor’s degree from David Lipscomb University in Nashville, Tenn., and received a master’s degree from George Peabody College for Teachers in Nashville, which later merged with Vanderbilt University.

Mr. Bloomingburg served as an Army medic during World War II, with stints in North Africa, Italy, France and Germany, and was awarded the Bronze Star and Silver Star.

He later taught history and government in the Arlington public school system for 35 years, spending much of his time teaching at Washington-Lee. He retired from teaching in 1985.

Since the early 1940s, Mr. Bloomingburg and his family were members of the Arlington Church of Christ, where he taught a Bible class and served as a church elder for 17 years.

In addition, Mr. Bloomingburg was active for many years in the Meals on Wheels program in Arlington.

As a reflection of his interest in Christian education, he was instrumental in the development of a youth camp called Camp Wamava near Front Royal, Va., and served for years as a board member of the Church of Christ Children’s Home, which later became Rainbow Christian Services in Gainesville, Va.

Mr. Bloomingburg was interested in the history of the D.C. area and often took friends on guided historical tours of the region.

He married the former Helen Bonner in 1951 in Covington, Ky., and the couple celebrated their 54th anniversary last year.

In addition to his wife, Mr. Bloomingburg is survived by twin daughters Beth Chalk of Lexington Park, Md., and Brenda Crain of Ocilla, Ga.; son Jim Bloomingburg of Henderson; twin brother Wendell Bloomingburg of Henderson; seven grandchildren; and one great-grandchild.

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