- The Washington Times - Sunday, November 9, 2008

DeAngelo Hall, the newest Redskin, strikes me as the kind of guy who would donate millions to his alma mater for a new building …as long as it was named DeAngelo Hall.

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Still, they’ll love Hall at RedskinsTV, chatterbox that he is. In fact, they might have to give him his own channel.

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It’s hard to fault Dan Snyder and Vinny Cerrato for signing him. Granted, DeAngelo had his problems in Oakland, but lots of players have had problems in Oakland. Randy Moss had them - and the season after he was traded caught a record 23 touchdown passes for the Patriots. Kerry Collins, meanwhile, couldn’t win there - and now he’s the quarterback of the 8-0 Titans.

That’s not to say Hall will be the second coming of Darrell Green, but I’d be surprised if he wasn’t at least serviceable.

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The kid, let’s not forget, hasn’t turned 25 yet - and already he has 20 interceptions. Consider: Rod Woodson (71 career INTs) had only eight picks before his 25th birthday. Ronnie Lott (63 total) had 13. Deion Sanders (53) had 14. Green (55) had just nine.

I haven’t had time to completely research it, but you might have to go back to Everson Walls in the early 1980s to find a cornerback who had more interceptions at such a young age. (Walls picked off 25 passes for the Cowboys before he turned 25 in December 1984.)

And as turnover starved as the Redskins are …

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The Patriots also pursued Hall, but Bill Belichick refused to divulge details. “I’ll just comment on the players we have,” he said.

Don’t tell me the man doesn’t have a sense of humor, though. “When asked if he had any past relationship with Hall,” Mike Reiss of the Boston Globe wrote in his blog, “Belichick noted they had been at the Pro Bowl simultaneously, but on different teams.

“‘I think we might have been in the pool together,’ Belichick said.”

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NFL players continue to complain about getting fined by the league for plays that didn’t draw a penalty.

I know exactly how you feel, guys. I just found out in the mail that I got caught by a speed camera going 47 in a 35 mph zone.

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Speaking of gratuitous violence, Blitz: The League II, the latest version of the goriest football video game ever invented, is now in stores. And get this, kids: It includes a new feature, “precision aim tackles,” that enables you target a particular area of an opposing player’s body.

As pitchman Lawrence Taylor explained it to AOL, “For example, you may find out a certain player on the other team - like a running back - may have a knee problem. When you tackle that player, you can direct the area you want to attack. You might want to attack that knee to put him out of the game and thereby enhance your possibilities of winning.”

Lovely.

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Just as there’s nothing subtle about the game - it’s kind of the Ultimate Fighting version of the NFL - there’s nothing subtle about its promotion. “If you don’t [buy it],” the manufacturer vows, “LT will hunt you down and treat you like Joe Theismann.”

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Interesting column the other day by Bob Kravitz of the Indianapolis Star. Kravitz talked to the Colts’ Tony Dungy - the first black man to coach a Super Bowl winner - about another trailblazer, Barack Obama.

Dungy laughed about how his feat was “not even in the same universe” with Obama’s. Then he mentioned how, at the time of Brown v. the Board of Education, the landmark 1954 Supreme Court decision that outlawed educational segregation, his father, Wilber, “taught science in an all-black school in Alexandria, Va. The [school] building right next door was all-white. He’d always say, ‘I’ve got to get my students to learn just as much as the students in that building over there.’”

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Ryan Leaf’s continuing personal drama - he has resigned as the QB coach at West Texas A&M because of a drug charge - is yet another reminder of how shaky the top of the 1998 draft was. Three of the first five players were total busts: Leaf (Chargers, second), defensive end Andre Wadsworth (Cardinals, third) and running back Curtis Enis (Bears, fifth). Not one of them lasted beyond his third season.

Then there’s Kyle Turley, the seventh player picked (by the Saints). The only thing he ever led the league in was tattoos, though he did set a record for longest helmet throw.

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My namesake e-mailed last week that he was greatly entertained by PGA Tour players’ reactions to Obama’s election - especially Boo Weekley’s. Weekley was intending to retire when he reached $8 million in career earnings, but “that number went up,” he said, “as of [Tuesday] night.”

To which the Northwestern freshman replied: “You’ve gotta love Boo. He didn’t even know how match play worked before the Ryder Cup. But he’s an expert on the U.S. tax code.”

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So I’m reading about this amateur golfer in Illinois who recorded five holes-in-one in a week and I’m thinking: Who was his witness, Kim Jong Il?

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Fortunately, the golfer, Curt Hocker, has hole-in-one insurance at El Paso Country Club. So whenever he makes an ace, the club - not he - must uphold the tradition and buy everyone in the clubhouse a drink.

There’s no truth to the rumor that John Daly has applied for membership.

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A story out of New York says the FBI kept tabs on David Halberstam for more than two decades. Is anybody shocked by this? I mean, before he died last year, Halberstam wrote two books about Ted Williams (“Summer of ‘49” and “The Teammates”). Agents were probably hoping he’d lead them to Teddy Ballgame’s missing head.

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Is it just me or does Erik Spoelstra, the Miami Heat’s new coach, look like Mitch Albom’s handsomer, younger brother?

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Did you see Carmelo Anthony has opened a barbershop in Denver called Studio 15?

Too bad he doesn’t play for the Clippers.

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News item: A federal jury awards mountain biker Susan Hayward more than $300,000 in a lawsuit over her removal from the 2004 U.S. Olympic team.

Comment: It was an uphill battle, but if anybody’s going to win an uphill battle …

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And finally …

When Sarah Palin returned to Alaska on Wednesday after the Republican ticket lost the election, supporters greeted her with chants of “2012! 2012!” the Associated Press reported.

Help me out here. Does that mean they want her to run for president in four years or was that the final score when Palin’s Wasilla High School team won the girls state basketball title in 1982?