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The Defense Department will resume paying education grants for military spouses, but plans to exclude families of most officers for budget reasons are coming under attack.

Defense officials have struggled to keep the program from busting its budget after an overwhelming number of military spouses applied. The financial strain caused a temporary suspension of the grants in February.

Plans for keeping the program within its $174 million budget, first announced Tuesday, are generating howls of protest.

The government says eligibility will be limited to most enlisted ranks and junior officers.

Steve Strobridge of the Military Officers Association of America said Thursday the officer limits unfairly freeze out military families who serve the longest.

GAO

Probe calls DNA test results bogus

Government investigators say personalized DNA tests that claim to predict a person’s likelihood of developing diseases are misleading and offer little or no useful information.

An undercover investigation by the Government Accountability Office found that four genetic-testing companies delivered contradictory predictions for the same person’s DNA. Investigators also found that the test results often contradicted patients’ actual medical histories.

The GAO reported its findings at a congressional hearing to scrutinize companies that mass-market personalized DNA tests.

The House Energy and Commerce Committee will later hear testimony from three genomic-testing companies — 23andMe, Navigenics and Pathway Genomics Corp.

SOUTH CAROLINA

Greene’s military records released

COLUMBIA | Surprise U.S. Senate nominee Alvin Greene frequently mentions his 13 years of military service, but records obtained Thursday by the Associated Press show that the veteran who has called himself an “American hero” was considered a lackluster service member at best.

The records, which document his superiors’ decisions to pass over Mr. Greene for promotion, cite mistakes as severe as improperly uploading sensitive intelligence information to a military server, and as basic as an overall inability to clearly express his thoughts and perform basic tasks.

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