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STEYN: Leadership in the abstract

Obama slips on the oil while bestriding the globe

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So, a man swept into office on an unprecedented tide of delirious fawning is watching his presidency sink in an unstoppable gush. That's almost too apt. Unfortunately, in the real world, a disastrous presidency has consequences. So let me begin by citing the leader of Her Majesty's Loyal Opposition in Canada. Whoa, whoa, don't stampede for the exits. The Canadian thing's just a starting point, I promise. If I'm still droning on about inside-Ottawa stuff five paragraphs down, feel free to turn the page to our exclusive 12-page pictorial preview of "Sex and the City 3," starring Estelle Getty as Kim Cattrall.

Anyway, a couple of years back, Michael Ignatieff, a professor at Harvard University and previously a BBC late-night intellectual telly host, returned to his native land of Canada in order to become prime minister, and to that end, got himself elected as leader of the Liberal Party. As is the fashion nowadays, he cranked out a quickie tome laying out his political "vision." Having spent his entire adult life abroad, he was aware that some of the natives were uncertain about his commitment to the land of his birth. So he was careful to issue a sort of pledge of a kind of allegiance, explaining that writing a book about Canada had "deepened my attachment to the place on earth that, if I needed one, I would call home."

Gee, that's awfully big of you. As John Robson commented in the Ottawa Citizen: "I'm worried that a man so postmodern he doesn't need a home wants to lead my country. Why? Is it quaint? An interesting sociological experiment?"

Indeed. But there's a lot of it about. Many Americans are beginning to pick up the strange vibe that for Barack Obama, governing America is "an interesting sociological experiment," too. He doubtless would agree that the United States is "the place on earth that, if I needed one, I would call home." But he doesn't, not really.

It is hard to imagine Mr. Obama wandering along to watch a Memorial Day or Fourth of July parade until the job required him to do so. That's not to say he's un-American or anti-American, but merely that he's beyond all that. Way beyond. He's the first president to give off the pronounced whiff that he's condescending to the job - that it's really too small for him and he's just killing time until something more commensurate with his stature comes along.

And so the Gulf spill was an irritation, but he dutifully went through the motions of flying in to be photographed looking presidentially concerned. As he wearily explained to Matt Lauer, "I was meeting with fishermen down there, standing in the rain, talking." Good grief, what more do you people want? Alas, he's not a good enough actor to fake it. So the more desperately he butchers up the rhetoric - "Plug the damn hole ... I know whose ass to kick" - the more pathetically unconvincing it all sounds.

No doubt my observations about Mr. Obama's remoteness from the rhythms of American life will be seen by his dwindling band of beleaguered cheerleaders as just another racist, right-wing attempt to whip up the backwoods, knuckle-dragging swamp dwellers of America by playing on their fears of "the other" - the sophisticated, worldly cosmopolitan for whom France is more than a reliable punch line. But in fact, my complaint is exactly the opposite: Mr. Obama's postmodern detachment is feeble and parochial. It's true that he hadn't seen much of America until he ran for president, but he hadn't seen much of anywhere else, either. Like most multiculturalists, he has passed his entire adulthood in a very narrow unicultural environment where your ideological worldview doesn't depend on anything so tedious as actually viewing the world.

The aforementioned Michael Ignatieff, who actually has viewed the world, gets close to the psychology in his response to criticisms of him for spending so much time abroad. Deploring such "provincialism," he replied: "They say it makes me less of a Canadian. It makes me more of a Canadian."

Well, yes, you can see what he's getting at. Today, to be an educated citizen of a mature Western democracy - Canada or Germany, England or Sweden - is not to feel Canadian or German, English or Swedish, heaven forbid, but rather to regard oneself as a "citoyen du monde" (global citizen). Obviously, if being "more Canadian" requires one literally to be a Harvard professor or a BBC TV host or an essayist for the Guardian, then very few Canadians would pass the test. What he really means is that in a post-national, postmodern Western world, the definition of "Canadian" (and Dutch and Belgian and Irish) is how multicultural and globalized you feel. The United Nations, Greenpeace, Amnesty International, Bono: These are the colors a progressive, worldly Westerner nails to his mast. You don't need to go anywhere or do anything: You just need to pick up the general groove, which you can do very easily at almost any college campus.

This Mr. Obama did brilliantly. A man who speaks fewer languages than the famously moronic George W. Bush, he has nevertheless grasped the essential lingo of the European transnationalist: Continental leaders strike attitudes rather than effect action - which is, frankly, beneath them. One thinks of the insistence a few years ago by Louis Michel, the then-Belgian foreign minister, that the so-called European Rapid Reaction Force "must declare itself operational without such a declaration being based on any true capability." As even The Washington Post drily remarked, "Apparently in Europe this works."

Apparently. Thus, Barack Obama: He declared himself operational without such a declaration being based on any true capability. But, if it works for the EU, why not America? Like many of his background here and there, Mr. Obama is engaged mostly by abstractions and generalities. Indeed, he is the very model of a modern major generalist. He has grand plans for "the environment" - all of it, wherever it may be. Why should the great eco-Gulliver be ensnared by some Lilliputian oil spill lapping 'round his boots? He flew into Cairo to give one of the most historically historic speeches in history to the Muslim world. Why should such a colossus lower his visionary gaze to contemplate some no-account nickel-'n'-dime racket like the Iranian nuclear program? With one stroke of his pen, he has transformed the health care of 300 million people. But I suppose if there's some killer flu epidemic or a cholera outbreak in New Mexico, you losers will be whining at Mr. Obama to do something about that, too.

In recent months, a lot of Americans have said to me that they had no idea the new president would feel so "weird." But, in fact, he's not weird. True, he's not, even in Democrat terms, a political figure - as, say, Bill Clinton or Joe Biden are. Instead, he's the product of the broader culture: There are millions of people like Mr. Obama, the eternal students of a vast lethargic, transnational campus for whom global compassion and the multicultural pose are merely the modish gloss on a cult of radical, grandiose narcissism. As someone once said, "We are the ones we've been waiting for." When you've spent that long waiting in line for yourself, it's bound to be a disappointment.

Mark Steyn is author of the New York Times best-seller "America Alone" (Regnery, 2006).

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