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If the bill is changed at all, in the form of amendments or budget strikes, it will have to go back to the House for another vote, throwing another wrench into the process.

Republicans have promised a fight, warning they plan to put up every procedural obstacle they can. They’ve already eyed parts of the bill that they contend are not related to the budget and can be brought up as a violation of the so-called “Byrd” rule.

Mrs. Pelosi said Friday that she doesn’t foresee any Byrd-rule violations surviving.

“We tried to have a ‘Byrd’ scrub,” she said, but “the parliamentarian would not necessarily give us definitive answers on anything.”

Republicans said Sunday they like their chances on an objection that the bill affects Social Security, which would be a violation of budget rules. If the parliamentarian agrees and the presiding officer of the Senate upholds the decision, Democrats would need 60 votes to override the decision. All 41 Republicans recently signed a letter saying they will object to overriding the parliamentarian.

“We’ve informed our colleagues in the House that we believe the bill they’re now considering violates the clear language of Section 310g of the Congressional Budget Act, and the entire reconciliation bill is subject to a point of order and rejection in the Senate should it pass the House,” said Don Stewart, spokesman for Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky.