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In last week’s attack by LulzSec, the group posted case files and the phone numbers and addresses of some officers. Many of the files LulzSec posted online were innocuous and included invitations to conferences and even some inspirational messages. Others focused on the activity and habits of drug cartels and threats to homeland security.

Those officers had access to their accounts through remote hookups. That practice has now stopped and no access is allowed from outside a secure agency network, Harrison said.

There is no evidence that the department’s main servers, which can access criminal files, driver’s license information and vehicle registration records, have been compromised, Harrison said.

The cyber attackers said they were specifically targeting DPS because of Arizona’s tough immigration enforcement law known as SB1070 “and the racial profiling anti-immigrant police state that is Arizona.”

LulzSec has previously taken credit for hacking into Sony Corp. _ where more than 100 million user accounts were compromised _ and defacing the PBS website, as well as a cyber-attacking the CIA website and the U.S. Senate’s computer system.