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On Tuesday, Mrs. Clinton unveiled details of an economic support package aimed at helping to create badly needed jobs, mainly for Egypt’s exploding youth population, and spur foreign investment. In addition to an already announced $150 million being redirected to the transition and the financial sector, the aid will include tens of billions of dollars in credits and private-sector loans as well as the expansion of Egyptian facilities eligible to send duty-free exports to the United States.

While trying to help Egypt resolve some of its most critical economic woes, Mrs. Clinton pleaded with Egypt’s transitional authorities, as well as private civic groups that played a leading role in the anti-Mubarak protests, to embrace reform guided by two key ideas: nonviolence and national unity.

She applauded an announcement Tuesday of further dismantling of the hated state security apparatus and said Egypt now needs to prepare for free, fair elections to produce “leaders that will be able to respond to (your) aspirations.”

She is traveling later Wednesday to Tunisia, where she will be bringing the same message. The success of Tunisia’s anti-government protests in January fueled similar revolts across the Arab world.