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In 1993, she won a lifetime achievement award from the American Film Institute; in 1999, an institute survey of screen legends ranked her No. 7 among actresses.

During much of her later career, Taylor’s waistline, various diets, diet books and tangled romances were the butt of jokes by Joan Rivers and others. John Belushi mocked her on “Saturday Night Live,” dressing up in drag and choking on a piece of chicken.

“It’s a wonder I didn’t explode,” Taylor wrote of her 60-pound weight gain _ and successful loss _ in the 1988 book “Elizabeth Takes Off on Self-Esteem and Self-Image.”

She was an iconic star, but her screen roles became increasingly rare in the 1980s and beyond. She appeared in several television movies, including “Poker Alice” and “Sweet Bird of Youth,” and entered the Stone Age as Pearl Slaghoople in the movie version of “The Flintstones.” She had a brief role on the popular soap opera “General Hospital.”

Taylor was the subject of numerous unauthorized biographies and herself worked on a handful of books, including “Elizabeth Taylor: An Informal Memoir” and “Elizabeth Taylor: My Love Affair With Jewelry.” In tune with the media to the end, she kept in touch through her Twitter account.

“I like the connection with fans and people who have been supportive of me,” Taylor told Kim Kardashian in a 2011 interview for Harper’s Bazaar. “And I love the idea of real feedback and a two-way street, which is very, very modern. But sometimes I think we know too much about our idols and that spoils the dream.”

Survivors include her daughters Maria Burton-Carson and Liza Todd-Tivey, sons Christopher and Michael Wilding, 10 grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.

A private family funeral is planned later this week.

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Associated Press Writers Bob Thomas and David Bauder contributed to this report.