Cash-strapped Postal Service to charge 45 cents per stamp

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It will cost a penny more to mail a letter next year.

The cash-strapped U.S. Postal Service announced Tuesday that it will increase postage rates Jan. 22, including a 1-cent increase in the cost of first-class mail, to 45 cents.

Under law, the post office cannot raise prices more than the rate of inflation, which is 2.1 percent, unless it gets special permission from the independent Postal Regulatory Commission. The commission last year turned down such a request.

The post office lost $8 billion in fiscal 2010 and the bottom line is likely to be even worse when final figures for fiscal 2011 are released next month.

The rate increase will make only a small dent in those losses, caused by the recession, movement of mail to the Internet, and a requirement that the agency fund future retiree medical benefits years in advance.

Other proposals to cut the losses have included reduction of mail delivery from six to five days a week and closing thousands of post offices across the country.

The current 44-cent rate has been in effect since May 2009.

“The overall average price increase is small and is needed to help address our current financial crisis,” Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe said. “We continue to take actions within our control to increase revenue in other ways and to aggressively cut costs. To return to sound financial footing, we urgently need enactment of comprehensive, long-term legislation to provide the Postal Service with a more flexible business model.”

The Postal Regulatory Commission now has 45 days to verify that the new prices comply with the law limiting the increase to an average of 2.1 percent across all types of mail. They can then take effect.

Because most stamps being issued are “Forever” stamps, they will remain good for first-class postage. But buying new Forever stamps will cost more when the prices go up.

While the price for the first ounce of a first-class letter will rise to 45 cents, the cost for each additional ounce will remain at the current 20 cents.

Other prices will also change including:

• Postcards will go up 3 cents to 32 cents.

• Letters to Canada and Mexico will increase a nickel to 85 cents.

• Letters to other foreign countries will go up 7 cents to $1.05.

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