Continued from page 1

Around Newtown, snow-laden branches were snapping off trees every few minutes. Roads that were plowed became impassible because the trees were falling so fast.

Some other inland towns got more than a foot of snow. West Milford, N.J., about 45 miles northwest of New York, saw 19 inches by early Sunday.

New Jersey’s largest electric and gas utility, PSE&G, warned customers to prepare for “potentially lengthy outages” and advised power might not be fully restored until Wednesday. More than 600,000 lost electricity in the state, including Gov. Chris Christie.

Along the coast and in such cities as Boston, relatively warm water temperatures helped keep snowfall totals much lower. Washington received a trace of snow, tying a 1925 record for the date. New York’s Central Park set a record for both the date and the month of October with 1.3 inches of snow.

But in New Hampshire’s capital of Concord, more than 22 inches fell, weeks ahead of the usual first measurable snowfall. Trees downtown still bright with fall colors were covered with snow. Some didn’t survive — a large oak tree that had stood alongside the Statehouse fell, partially blocking a side street.

By 8 a.m., Dave Whitcher already had been clearing dozens of parking lots around town for eight hours as part of his work as a property manager.

Holding up his shovel, he said, “Me and this guy are going to get to know each other real well today.”

Residents were urged to avoid travel altogether. Speed limits were reduced on bridges between New Jersey and Pennsylvania. A few roads closed because of accidents and downed trees and power lines, and more were expected, said Sean Brown, a spokesman for the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation.

Two of the airports serving New York, Newark Liberty and Kennedy, had hours-long delays Saturday, as did Philadelphia’s airport. Commuter trains in Connecticut and New York were delayed or suspended because of downed trees and signal problems. Amtrak suspended service between Philadelphia and Harrisburg, Pa., and one train from Chicago to Boston got stuck overnight in Palmer, Mass. The 48 passengers had food and heat, a spokeswoman said, and were taken by bus Sunday to their destinations.

In southeastern Pennsylvania, an 84-year-old man was killed when a snow-laden tree fell on his home while he was napping in his recliner. In Connecticut, the governor said one person died in a Colchester traffic accident that he blamed on slippery conditions.

And a 20-year-old man in Springfield, Mass., stopped when he saw police and firefighters examining downed wires and stepped in the wrong place and was electrocuted, Capt. William Collins said.

Parts of New York state saw a mix of snow, rain and slush that made for sheer misery at the “Occupy Wall Street” encampment in New York City, where drenched protesters hunkered down in tents and under tarps as the plaza filled with rainwater and melted snow.

Technically, tents are banned in the park, but protesters say authorities have been looking the other way, even despite a crackdown on generators that were keeping them warm.

Nick Lemmin, 25, of the New York borough of Brooklyn was spending his first night at the encampment. He was one of a handful of protesters still at the park early Sunday.

“I had to come out and support,” he said. “The underlying importance of this is such that you have to weather the cold.”

Story Continues →