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She made the 100 meters after a week of tumult at U.S. trials, finishing in a dead heat for the third and final spot. She faced a run-off against the teammate she tied, but got the spot when that teammate withdrew at the last second.

“I’m happy. I got a personal best,” Felix said. “I’m looking forward to the 200.”

Jeter offered a great big smile after watching her visions of gold vanish by a sliver.

“Everyone wants to win, but I’m on the podium,” Jeter said. “I’m the only American on the podium.”

She’s also one of the biggest enigmas in American track — a late bloomer at age 32 and not much of a talker. She had been the favorite for this event until Fraser-Pryce, not on form through much of the early season, announced she was back with a 10.70 in Kingston last month.

Now, one of those questions any Olympian would love to be asked: Which gold means more?

“I’d have to say Beijing because I was inexperienced, I was young and I never believed I could. But I did,” she said. “This year I came into the championship as a favorite, which was a first for me, so I was a bit nervous. But I believed in myself.”

As magical a night as it was for the Jamaicans, the end of Fraser-Pryce’s win was met with relative silence — or maybe it just seemed that way compared to what had transpired over the previous hour or so.

This happened to be the day when the British finally had their big moment at their Olympics — actually one of their best days at any Olympics.

In rapid succession, the host country won three straight gold medals.