Boehner to hold vote on ‘Plan B’ to skirt ‘fiscal cliff’

Next step will be Obama’s

  • ** FILE ** President Obama speaks at a news conference in the briefing room of the White House on Wednesday, Dec. 19, 2012 in Washington. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)** FILE ** President Obama speaks at a news conference in the briefing room of the White House on Wednesday, Dec. 19, 2012 in Washington. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)
  • President Barack Obama walks to the Oval Office of the White House as he returns from greeting members of the staff, Tuesday, Dec. 18, 2012, in Washington. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)President Barack Obama walks to the Oval Office of the White House as he returns from greeting members of the staff, Tuesday, Dec. 18, 2012, in Washington. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
  • Speaker of the House John Boehner, R-Ohio, joined by the Republican leadership speaks to reporters about the fiscal cliff negotiations with President Obama following a closed-door strategy session, at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 18, 2012.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Speaker of the House John Boehner, R-Ohio, joined by the Republican leadership speaks to reporters about the fiscal cliff negotiations with President Obama following a closed-door strategy session, at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 18, 2012. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
  • ** FILE ** Speaker of the House John Boehner, R-Ohio, joined by Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, left, and House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, R-Va., right, as they finish a news conference about the fiscal cliff negotiations after a closed-door GOP strategy session, at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 18, 2012. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)** FILE ** Speaker of the House John Boehner, R-Ohio, joined by Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, left, and House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, R-Va., right, as they finish a news conference about the fiscal cliff negotiations after a closed-door GOP strategy session, at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 18, 2012. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
  • Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada speaks to reporters following the Democratic policy luncheon on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 18, 2012. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada speaks to reporters following the Democratic policy luncheon on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 18, 2012. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
  • House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, R-Va., second from right, walks to a Republican strategy session with Speaker of the House John Boehner, R-Ohio, at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 18, 2012.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, R-Va., second from right, walks to a Republican strategy session with Speaker of the House John Boehner, R-Ohio, at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 18, 2012. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
  • Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., talks on the phone on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 18, 2012. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., talks on the phone on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 18, 2012. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
  • Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, walks away from the podium after speaking to reporters following the Republican policy luncheon on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 18, 2012. McConnell is flanked by Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., left, and Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wy., right. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, walks away from the podium after speaking to reporters following the Republican policy luncheon on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 18, 2012. McConnell is flanked by Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., left, and Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wy., right. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Republicans were still tweaking the final version of their bill late Wednesday in order to try to win enough support.

Mr. Boehner says his plan will keep taxes low for 99.8 percent of taxpayers, and would amount to a $3.9 billion tax cut compared with the current law.

The White House, though, said Mr. Boehner’s Plan B would amount to a $50,000 tax cut for millionaires, who will still pay lower rates on their income up to $1 million.

White House Communications Director Dan Pfeiffer faulted Mr. Boehner’s plan for what it left out: It does not extend unemployment benefits, it does not end the looming $110 billion in spending cuts, and it fails to boost payments for doctors who treat Medicare patients.

Republicans said their Plan B was not intended to solve the entire fiscal cliff, but rather to be a short-term solution to make sure tax rates didn’t rise for most Americans on Jan. 1.

Seth McLaughlin and Susan Crabtree contributed to this report.

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