- The Washington Times - Wednesday, December 19, 2012

The Palestinian Authority petition to the United Nations General Assembly was a direct violation of the Oslo Accord because all matters were supposed to be settled through bilateral negotiation (“U.N. should butt out of Israeli-Palestinian conflict,” Commentary, Dec. 4). This is in addition to many other Palestinian violations, the most prominent being the Palestinian Authority’s (PA) incitement of hatred and violence.

The PA continues to glorify terrorists and their murderous actions. In July, Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas sponsored a new computer center and named it “after the martyr Dalal Mughrabi.” Mughrabi led the most deadly terror attack in Israel’s history. Her 1978 bus hijacking killed 37 civilians, 12 of them children. Honoring her shows that Mr. Abbas is neither moderate nor looking for peace. The message this sends to Palestinian children is very harmful in that it encourages terrorism. A comparison would be naming a new facility after Adam Lanza following the Newtown, Conn., massacre.

The Middle East is in great turmoil. Iran is continuing its development of nuclear weapons and intercontinental missiles to deliver them. Forty-thousand people have been killed in Syria, heavy fighting goes on there, and the threat of poison gas, a weapon of mass destruction, is very real. Egypt is on the verge of a civil war. Much of Mali is under al Qaeda control and terrorists are running amuck in Iraq, Jordan, Yemen and Lebanon.

Yet with all this going on, the European Union is worried over proposed construction of new housing on vacant land in eastern Jerusalem. Israel’s right to Jerusalem is no less than the right of the British to London or that of the French to Paris. That is an understatement because the Jews have lived in Israel for thousands of years — before either London or Paris were built.


After considering all of the many PA violations of the peace accord, the question should arise: How worthwhile is another accord? If Palestinians have broken their word many times in the past, what should persuade Israel that the next accord will be kept?

ARTHUR HORN

East Windsor, N.J.