Rock ’n’ roll hazardous to health?: Mortality rate found higher for musicians

They found that performers who had had at least one adverse childhood experience were more likely to die from drug and alcohol use or “risk-related causes.”

“Substance abuse and risk-taking in stars are largely discussed in terms of hedonism, music industry culture, responses to the pressures of fame or even part of the creative process,” the researchers said.

However, they said, “adverse experiences in early life may leave some predisposed to health-damaging behaviors, with fame and extreme wealth providing greater opportunities to engage in risk-taking.”

But Ellis Cashmore, a cultural studies professor at Staffordshire University and author of the book “Celebrity/Culture,” said it would be wrong to overlook “artistic frustration” as a factor in artistic self-destruction.

He said troubled artists from Vincent Van Gogh and Ernest Hemingway to the Beach Boys’ Brian Wilson all illustrate “the torment that creativity brings with it.”

“Perhaps it is the continual striving for some sort of unattainable artistic perfection that drives them,” he said.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus
TWT Video Picks