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Kubbel’s solution involves an ingenious mate employing a bare minimum of forces. White wins with the remarkable 1. Nc6! (Bf6? a2 2. Bxd4 3. Kxd4 3. Nc6+ Ke4 and the Black pawn queens) Kxc6 (1. … a2 2. Nb4+) 2. Bf6 Kd5 (Kc5? 3. Be7+) 3. d3 a2 4. c4+ Kc5 (dxc3 5. Bxc3 is a technical win for White) 5. Kb7! a1=Q 6. Be7 mate — an expected mating pattern in the center of the board.

Naranja-Cardoso, Manila, 1974

1. c4 e5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. Nf3 Nc6 4. g3 Bb4 5. Bg2 O-O 6. O-O e4 7. Ng5 Bxc3 8. bxc3 Re8 9. d3 exd3 10. exd3 h6 11. Nf3 b6 12. Re1 Bb7 13. Bf4 d6 14. Qd2 Ne7 15. h3 Qd7 16. Kh2 Ng6 17. Be3 c5 18. a4 Rad8 19. a5 Bxf3 20. Bxf3 Ne5 21. Bg2 Qf5 22. axb6 axb6 23. f4 Nxd3 24. g4 Qh7 25. Rad1 Nb2 26. Qxb2 Rxe3 27. Qxb6 Rde8 28. f5 h5 29. g5 Qxf5 30. gxf6 Re2 31. Qb7 Qf4+ 32. Kh1 R8e3 33. Qb8+ Kh7 34. Qxd6 Rxh3+ White resigns.

Reshevsky-Bogart, Simultaneous exhibition, Los Angeles 1956

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nf6 4. Ng5 d5 5. exd5 Nxd5 6. d4 f6 7. dxe5 fxg5 8. Qxd5 Qxd5 9. Bxd5 Be7 10. O-O Bf5 11. c3 Nxe5 12. Bxb7 Rd8 13. Re1 O-O 14. Nd2 Bf6 15. Ne4 Bxe4 16. Bxe4 h6 17. Be3 a5 18. Bc5 Rfe8 19. Rad1 Kh8 20. Rxd8 Rxd8 21. Kf1 Ng4 22. h3 Ne5 23. Ke2 Nc4 24. Rd1 Rxd1 25. Kxd1 Nxb2+ 26. Kc2 Na4 27. Bd4 Bxd4 28. cxd4 Draw agreed.

David R. Sands can be reached at 202/636-3178 or by email at dsands@washingtontimes.com.