Ohio couple get 8 years in in son’s cancer death

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Lillian Hussing said earlier the family didn’t have money for medical care when they lived in Warren, tried repeatedly to get help from social services and visited a free clinic but left when told they would have to pay $180.

The family soon moved to Cleveland and the boy died within weeks.

Prosecutors say that while the boy was suffering, the parents claimed financial hardship but paid $87 to have a pit bull treated for fleas. Hussing’s defense attorney, John Luskin, said the dog belonged to Hussing’s parents and her parents paid for the treatment.

Trumbull County Children Services says it had worked with the family to provide Willie health care, getting involved after receiving a phone call in July 2007. Agency officials said a case worker visited the family at least monthly and pushed the parents to have a medical follow-up on his swollen neck but they didn’t.

However, Robinson’s attorney Thomas Rein said previously that a social worker who visited the family in January 2008 “indicated the kids were healthy and happy.” He said no one knew the boy had cancer until he died and an autopsy was performed.

And Lillian Hussing said a case worker had told the family the boy’s lump looked like a swollen gland and to hold off until they could secure financial assistance before getting it checked.

About two weeks after they moved to Cleveland, she said, her brother came down with something. Her mother treated him with cold medicine and he died within three days.

She said the boy never complained about his neck.

“He played, he went outside, he wrestled, he played video games,” the boy’s sister said. “He was the happiest kid you could imagine. It never seemed like he was suffering.”

The emotional aftermath from their son’s death led the couple to split, according to Luskin.

The couple’s four other children under 18 were placed in the custody of a family member. Luskin said Lillian Hussing, upon turning 18, decided to return to live with her mother.

Rein said Robinson agreed to plead guilty so his children could be spared any further grief and wouldn’t have to suffer by testifying. Lillian Hussing said her mother took a plea bargain because of the uncertainty of a trial and fear she could be sent to prison for a long time.

As part of the deal, the prosecution agreed to drop four counts each against each parent, including child endangering. Prosecutors didn’t agree to a sentence recommendation. Both Luskin and Rein had said they hoped the judge would consider probation.

“There’s not a day my client … starts without shedding a tear for his son,” Rein said.

The coroner ruled that the boy was a victim of medical neglect and died from pneumonia due to Hodgkin lymphoma.

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