Acquittal could boost Clemens’ Hall bid

continued from page 1

Question of the Day

Is it still considered bad form to talk politics during a social gathering?

View results

Union head Michael Weiner said Clemens was “vindicated.”

“We look forward to him taking his rightful place in the Hall of Fame,” Weiner said.

Vincent called it a “big win” for Clemens and his lawyer. “It’s a major defeat for the Justice Department _ one of a series,” he said. “I think the government is at a huge disadvantage against really good outside lawyers.”

Clemens is the latest sports figure to frustrate the federal government’s efforts to nab suspected steroid cheats despite prosecution costs of tens of millions of dollars.

Bonds, a seven-time NL MVP, was convicted of a single obstruction of justice count that he gave an evasive answer to a grand jury in 2003, and charges were dropped last year that he made false statements when he denied using performance-enhancing drugs.

A grand jury investigation of Lance Armstrong was dropped last winter without charges being filed, though the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency filed formal accusations last week that could strip the seven-time Tour de France winner of his victories in that storied race. Armstrong denies any doping.

Jeff Novitzky and his teams of investigators have obtained only two guilty pleas from athletes (Olympic track star Marion Jones and former NFL defensive lineman Dana Stubblefield); and two convictions (Bonds and sprint cyclist Tammy Thomas). Jones, who also pleaded guilty to making false statements about her association with a check-fraud scheme, was the only targeted athlete to serve a day in prison.

Bonds‘ conviction still must survive an appeal.

Clemens has no such worries. With a 354-184 record, 3.12 ERA and 4,672 strikeouts, he would have been a sure first-ballot Hall of Famer when the votes are totaled in January. But since the day the Mitchell Report was released, his reputation has been tainted by suspicion.

Still, Cleveland Indians pitcher Josh Tomlin was thrilled for Clemens, one of his boyhood heroes growing up in Texas.

“If a case goes on that long and the jury decides he’s not guilty, then obviously he’s telling the truth,” he said.

___

AP Sports Writers Howard Fendrich, Mike Fitzpatrick, Janie McCauley, Ben Walker and Tom Withers and Associated Press writer Fred Frommer contributed to this report.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus
Get Adobe Flash player