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All that video can deplete your data allowance in no time.

On the iPhone, the tool for measuring data usage isn’t easy to find. You have to choose “General” in your settings, then “Usage,” and then “Cellular Usage.” There’s info there on the amount of data sent and received, but no total. You have to remember to manually reset the counter each month on the day your billing cycle starts.

On the Galaxy, “Data usage” is the third item from the top under “Settings.” You can tell the phone when to warn you that you’re about to reach your cap for the month. You can also automatically disable data usage when you’ve reached a pre-specified point to avoid extra charges. You don’t have to do any math to get the total used, and the counter automatically resets each month. You can also see which apps use the most data.

Before I go further, I’ll say a few things about where the iPhone still excels.

_ The iPhone has more software from outside parties, extending the device’s functionality. Many apps are written only for the iPhone and other Apple devices. Versions for the Galaxy and other Android phones sometimes come months later and lack all of the features.

_ The iPhone works better than Android devices in corporate settings. Android, for instance, lacks the tools needed to access Wi-Fi at my office or the corporate email system (though some might consider that a plus for Android).

_ The iPhone has Siri, the virtual assistant that hears your voice commands and talks back.

The Galaxy introduces a voice assistant, but she’s best described as Siri’s forgotten stepchild. The Galaxy couldn’t find an Indian restaurant just a block from me, and she gave me the name of a doctor when I asked for Thai restaurants. The Galaxy also lacks Siri’s attitude and sense of humor.

Me: “What is the best smartphone?” Siri: “Wait, there are other phones?”

The Galaxy replied with the grammatically incorrect and boring, “Opinion vary but I think Samsung Galaxy is the best of them all.”

Here’s where the Galaxy prevails:

_ As with other Android devices, the Galaxy syncs well with Google services. By signing into a Google account, names, emails and phone numbers from my Gmail contacts are automatically transferred to the phone. The same happens with calendar entries. Apple uses a separate contact and calendar system, not the one I already use through Google.

_ You can remove the plastic back cover to switch the battery or insert a microSD card for additional storage of up to 64 gigabytes. The iPhone’s battery can be replaced only by a technician, and there’s no slot for more storage.

_ Both devices have two cameras, including an 8 megapixel one in the back. The Galaxy’s front-facing camera does more than take pictures: When you’re reading something, the camera will see your eyes glued on the screen, so your phone won’t switch to power-saving mode. The iPhone’s screen will start to dim if you don’t touch it periodically.

_ If you’re texting a friend and find it easier to discuss something by phone, the Galaxy will automatically call that person when you put the phone by your ear.

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