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_ When watching video stored on your device, there’s a “pop out” feature that lets you watch in a smaller window while doing other things such as email and Facebook on the phone.

_ The Galaxy’s near-field communications technology offers a preview of the future. One day, it could be common like Wi-Fi and Bluetooth. With it, I’m able to share photos and video simply by tapping the backs of two Galaxy phones together. I’m also able to make purchases at a handful of stores by tapping the phone to the merchant’s NFC reader, as long as I have credit cards set up through the Google Wallet app.

Alas, Google Wallet isn’t so useful until more merchants accept it, and the app is only available on the Sprint model of the Galaxy.

Basic sharing features, which let you swap small files, work with some other late-model Android phones. If you tap two Galaxy phones together, you can quickly transfer really big files, such as videos and photos.

All Galaxy models except T-Mobile’s will be able to use so-called fourth-generation, or 4G, networks. T-Mobile doesn’t have a 4G network, but its 3G network is almost as fast as a 4G network (and indeed, it calls its network “4G”).

Current iPhones don’t work with 4G technology, though the AT&T version says it does because it uses an upgraded 3G network, much like T-Mobile’s. The iPhone coming this fall is likely to support “real” 4G, using a technology called LTE.

The next iPhone will also have an Apple-designed mapping service with turn-by-turn directions spoken aloud. It’s one of the rare instances where the iPhone will play catch-up to Android, which has had Google’s voice navigation app built-in since 2009.

If you’re an iPhone owner looking for a new phone, I’d wait a few months and make a comparison then.

If you’re an Android user looking to switch to an iPhone, the Galaxy offers enough reason to stick with Android. You’ll miss out on the cachet of owning an iPhone or the joys of chatting with Siri, but you’ll get a solid device with the latest technologies.

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Anick Jesdanun, deputy technology editor for The Associated Press, can be reached at njesdanun(at)ap.org.