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Coverage: Uninsured

Two years ago, Grimmett had a job with good insurance and a wife with diabetes and other health problems. But then his job, doing plumbing and HVAC work at an Atlanta university, was outsourced and he no longer could cover his wife’s medical bills.

His wife had to stop going to the private doctors she was seeing, and her husband tried to get her into care elsewhere. But at other facilities, they encountered paperwork, delays and foot dragging, he said. Her health deteriorated.

“When you don’t have insurance, they treat you different,” he said.

In January 2011, Mary Grimmett started struggling to breathe and was rushed to Grady Memorial, Atlanta’s safety net hospital. She qualified for a program that provides discounted and even free care to uninsured people who qualify. But by that time she had pneumonia as well as a broken ankle that needed surgery and was very sick.

She spent two weeks in the hospital and then died of congestive heart failure _ a complication of her other illnesses. She was 39.

Today, Grimmett has a job, making $25,000 a year, but still has no insurance. Under the new health care law, he will be eligible for a government tax credit to help with the cost of buying private health insurance.

That would reduce his estimated annual premiums for health coverage from $5,054 to $1,726.

He is healthy, but the loss of his wife was a tragic lesson in the importance of coverage, he said. When he heard about the Supreme Court ruling from others at a nonprofit where he was volunteering, he said he felt grateful to Obama for helping the poor.

“He’s listening to the voice of Jehovah God,” he said. He added: “I’m grateful for the hope and opportunity to have health insurance, not just myself but all people who can’t afford health insurance. It’s a great thing that has taken place today.”

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Name: Jim Schreiber

Home: New York City

Age: 26

Occupation: Works for small beverage business

Story Continues →