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The Wilfs shared the stage with elected officials from the Legislature and Minneapolis, where the City Council must give final approval to its share of the cost in a vote expected later this month; Rybak has said he is confident it will pass.

The city is redirecting an existing hospitality tax to pay its $150 million share of the stadium construction, while the state will cover its $348 million contribution through taxes on new electronic versions of pulltabs, a low-tech paper game sold by charitable organizations in bars and restaurants.

The new stadium will be built on the downtown Minneapolis site of the Metrodome, the team’s current home. The team will move in by 2016.

Now that the bill is signed, Dayton said he is turning his attention to naming three members of the five-person Sports Facilities Authority that will own and operate the stadium and serve as the team’s landlord. Rybak will pick the other two.

“The team is obviously anxious to get going, and the clock is ticking already in getting it opened as soon as possible, so that’ll be top priority for the rest of this week,” Dayton said.