Taking Names: Beastie Boys’ Yauch dies of cancer

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Adam Yauch, the gravelly voiced Beastie Boys rapper who co-founded the seminal hip-hop group, has died at age 47.

Mr. Yauch’s representatives confirmed that the rapper died Friday morning in New York after a nearly three-year battle with cancer.

Also known as MCA, Mr. Yauch was diagnosed with a cancerous salivary gland in 2009. He had undergone surgery and radiation.

At the time, Mr. Yauch expressed hope it was “very treatable,” but his illness caused the group to cancel shows and delayed the release of their 2011 album, “Hot Sauce Committee Part Two.”

He hadn’t performed in public since 2009 and was absent when the Beastie Boys were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in April.

The Brooklyn-born Mr. Yauch created the Beastie Boys with high school friend Michael “Mike D” Diamond. Originally conceived as a hard-core punk group, it soon became a hip-hop trio after Adam “Ad-Rock” Horovitz joined. They released their chart-topping debut “Licensed to Ill” in 1986, a raucous album led by the anthem “(You Gotta) Fight for Your Right (To Party!)”

In the seven studio albums that followed, the Beastie Boys expanded considerably and grew more musically ambitious. Their follow-up, 1989’s “Paul’s Boutique,” ended any suggestion of the group as a one-hit wonder. Extensive in its sampling and sonically layered, the album was ranked the 156th greatest album ever by Rolling Stone magazine in 2003.

The Beastie Boys would later take up their own instruments — a rarity in hip-hop — on the album “Check Your Head” and subsequent releases.

The Beastie Boys — a trio of white Jewish men — established themselves as one of the most respected groups in hip-hop at a time when white rappers were few.

Introducing the group at the Rock Hall, Public Enemy rapper Chuck D said the Beastie Boys “broke the mold.”

Mr. Yauch is survived by his wife, Dechen Wangdu, and his daughter, Tenzin Losel Yauch.

Gary Sinise to perform at ‘Rockin’ for the Troops’

Actor Gary Sinise is helping promote a summer concert in suburban Chicago that will benefit veterans.

The “Forrest Gump” star helped kickoff ticket sales for “Rockin’ for the Troops” on Thursday at the Navistar headquarters in Lisle, Ill..

The concert is planned for July 21 in nearby Wheaton. Mr. Sinise is slated to perform with his Lt. Dan Band, which is named for his character in the Oscar-winning movie.

The Daily Herald reports that proceeds will benefit Operation Support Our Troops America. The Naperville-based charity has raised $2 million for projects benefiting veterans, including research on post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury.

Mr. Sinise said, “We all enjoy what the military provides for us.”

Moore trades @mrskutcher for @justdemi on Twitter

Demi Moore is no longer @mrskutcher, in real life or on Twitter. The 49-year-old actress changed her Twitter name to @justdemi on Thursday.

Miss Moore and Ashton Kutcher, who often used the micro-blogging site to post pictures of themselves and proclaim their love for one another, announced the end of their marriage in November. In April, Miss Moore asked her followers on the site for suggestions for a new handle.

TV personality Piers Morgan suggested, “How about @mrsmorgan?”

Miss Moore said she would “have to get clever” because so many names on the popular site have already been claimed.

She wrote Thursday that it was “so hard finding a name that was fun, somewhat playful and available.” She said her new name “could grow on me.”

Goober Pyle actor George Lindsey dies at age 83

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — George Lindsey, who spent nearly 30 years as the grinning Goober on “The Andy Griffith Show” and “Hee Haw,” has died. He was 83.

The Marshall Donnelly Combs Funeral Home in Nashville said Mr. Lindsay died early Sunday morning after a brief illness. Funeral arrangements were still being made Sunday afternoon.

Mr. Lindsey was the beanie-wearing Goober on “The Andy Griffith Show” from 1964 to 1968 and its successor, “Mayberry RFD,” from 1968 to 1971. He played the same jovial character — a service station attendant — on “Hee Haw” from 1971 until it went out of production in 1993.

“America has grown up with me,” Mr. Lindsey said in an Associated Press interview in 1985. “Goober is every man; everyone finds something to like about ol’ Goober.”

He joined “The Andy Griffith Show” in 1964 when Jim Nabors, portraying Gomer Pyle, left the program. Goober Pyle, who had been mentioned on the show as Gomer’s cousin, replaced him.

“At that time, we were the best acting ensemble on TV,” Mr. Lindsey said. “The scripts were terrific. Andy is the best script constructionist I’ve ever been involved with. And you have to lift your acting level up to his; he’s awfully good.”

In a statement released through the funeral home, Mr. Griffith said, “George Lindsey was my friend. I had great respect for his talent and his human spirit. In recent years, we spoke often by telephone. Our last conversation was a few days ago. … I am happy to say that as we found ourselves in our eighties, we were not afraid to say, ‘I love you.’ That was the last thing George and I had to say to each other. ‘I love you.’ “

Although he was best known as Goober, Mr. Lindsey had other roles during a long TV career.

His other TV credits included roles on “MASH,” “CHiPs,” “The Glen Campbell Goodtime Hour,” “The Real McCoys,” “Rifleman,” “The Alfred Hitchcock Hour,” “The Twilight Zone” and “Love, American Style.”

Compiled from Web and wire reports

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