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One older son, Faizullah, recalled being awoken by someone telling him there had been a shooting at his father’s compound. He rushed there to find him with a gunshot wound to the throat. One of Naim’s daughters was also wounded, as were two neighbor siblings.

Faizullah said he loaded the wounded into a car, using a blanket to lift some of them. They were treated at a nearby base, then flown to a bigger military hospital in Kandahar. All five survived.

Khamal Adin, who had a beard and was wearing a turban, sat at the witness table with his arms folded, his head tilted to the left. He described the carnage at the second village, Najiban.

The morning after the rampage, Adin said he arrived at a compound belonging to his cousin, Mohammed Wazir. Wazir had been away on a trip, and he found Wazir’s mother lying dead in a doorway, a gunshot to her head.

Further inside, Adin said, he found the bodies of six of his cousin’s seven children, the man’s wife, and other relatives. The fire that burned the bodies was out, but he said he could still smell smoke.

When Adin began to testify, Bales moved from his seat to be closer to the courtroom monitor.

Adin was asked if he could say he personally saw the bodies. He answered: “Yes. I have seen each individual and took them out by myself.” Asked to describe the injuries, he said: “Everybody was shot on the head. … I didn’t pay attention to the rest of the wounds.”

Prosecutors say Bales broke his shooting rampage into two episodes, attacking one village, returning to the base and then departing again to raid another.

In between his attacks, he woke a fellow soldier, reported what he’d done and said he was headed out to kill more, the soldier testified. But the soldier didn’t believe what Bales said, and went back to sleep.

Dressed in green fatigues, two Afghan National Army guards recounted what they had seen in the pre-dawn darkness outside the base the night of the killings.

One guard recounted that a man had arrived at the base and did not stop even after he asked him three times to do so. Later in the night, the second guard said, he saw a soldier leave the base — laughing as he went.

They did not say the soldier was the same person nor did they identify him as Bales.