- - Wednesday, November 14, 2012

CARMEL — A former California school teacher accuses school officials in a lawsuit of failing to accommodate her breast-feeding schedule.

The Monterey Herald reported that Sarah Ann Lewis Boyle has sued the Carmelo School, where she worked, and the Carmel Unified School District, claiming discrimination and wrongful termination.

The lawsuit was filed Oct. 30.

Ms. Boyle said that, before returning to work, she told a manager at the school that she would need about 15 minutes every day between 9 a.m. and 11 a.m. to pump her breasts.

She claims the manager told her to train her breast not to make milk then, and the district made no accommodations to allow her to feed her newborn. According to Ms. Boyle, she later received a negative evaluation and was urged to resign.

District spokesman Paul Behan said the district does not comment on litigation.

CALIFORNIA

Citizens’ well-being study is proposed by city

SANTA MONICA — Often referred to as the “people’s republic of Santa Monica” because of its socially conscious government, the Los Angeles coastal suburb now wants to find out whether its citizens are feeling groovy.

The Los Angeles Times said Santa Monica officials are seeking a grant to create the nation’s first municipal well-being index.

City officials and Rand Corp. researchers propose tracking the physical health, social connectedness and community resilience of residents.

Santa Monica made the proposal in hopes of winning a $5 million Bloomberg Philanthropies grant. It’s one of 20 Mayors Challenge finalists named last week.

The city has already completed a youth well-being study that found most students were healthy and felt safe at school.

NEW YORK

Suspect indicted in ‘79 Patz case

NEW YORK — A man authorities say confessed to the infamous 1979 disappearance of a 6-year-old boy from his New York City neighborhood has been formally charged with murder and kidnapping, a milestone in a case that has stymied investigators and Etan Patz’s devoted family for decades.

The indictment against Pedro Hernandez, 51, of Maple Shade, N.J., was made public Wednesday and sets up a potential showdown at trial over whether prosecutors can convince a jury that his claim that he strangled the boy — a secret kept for more than 30 years — is credible.

The suspect’s attorney has argued that Mr. Hernandez is mentally ill and prone to hallucinations, thus his confession can’t be trusted.

Prosecutors countered that an exhaustive post-arrest investigation found enough evidence to seek an indictment and proceed to trial.

ALASKA

Scientists: Lack of sea ice changes walrus behavior

ANCHORAGE — Federal scientists say a lack of summer sea ice is changing the behavior of Pacific walruses, but they don’t know what the effect will be.

Researchers from the U.S. Geological Survey and Russia tagged 251 walruses in the Chukchi Sea off Alaska’s northern coast and tracked their movements from 2008 to 2011. The results were released at a news conference Wednesday in Anchorage.

A release issued ahead of the news conference said the study shows walruses are arriving earlier than normal at northern feeding grounds in the summer. When sea ice melted completely, the walruses hauled out on land and foraged for food closer to shore.

Scientists say they don’t yet understand the impact of the new behavior, but noted possible higher mortality rates for younger walruses from being trampled.

From wire dispatches and staff reports