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But she added that “respect … ensures that parishes that are unable in conscience to accept women priests and bishops will be able to receive appropriate ministerial and episcopal oversight.”

But some found fault with the measure itself. Canon Simon Killwick from Manchester argued that it was “possible to be in favor of women bishops in principle, but to believe that this was the wrong legislation for introducing women bishops.”

Church officials say it may take five years to go through the process of taking new legislation to a final vote.

There was much talk from opponents about fresh negotiations, but few ideas about how to resolve the split. Bishops called an emergency meeting for Wednesday morning to assess the result, church officials said.

“We all think something different is right,” said Rev. James Dudley-Smith. “We are divided and yet today we are forcing ourselves to vote.”

Sister churches of the Anglican Communion in Australia, New Zealand and the United States already have women serving as bishops.

Southern Africa joined that group on Sunday with the consecration of Ellinah Wamukoya as the Anglican bishop of Swaziland.