Baker puts heart, soul into abbey’s fruitcake

  • Ernie Polanskas, bakery manager at the Holy Cross Abbey bakery in Berryville, Va., holds one of the famous fruitcakes made by the monks in front of the huge industrial-sized oven that they bought back in the 1960s to bake bread. The monks bake from January to September, making about 10,000 fruitcakes, which they ship all over the world, primarily during the holiday season. The proceeds from the sales go to support the day-to-day operations of the monastery. This image was made Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2012. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)Ernie Polanskas, bakery manager at the Holy Cross Abbey bakery in Berryville, Va., holds one of the famous fruitcakes made by the monks in front of the huge industrial-sized oven that they bought back in the 1960s to bake bread. The monks bake from January to September, making about 10,000 fruitcakes, which they ship all over the world, primarily during the holiday season. The proceeds from the sales go to support the day-to-day operations of the monastery. This image was made Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2012. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)
  • Brother Christopher Harmon enters new fruitcake orders into the computer on Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2012. The monks at Holy Cross Abbey in Berryville, Va. have been making and selling fruitcake since the 1980s.  (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)Brother Christopher Harmon enters new fruitcake orders into the computer on Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2012. The monks at Holy Cross Abbey in Berryville, Va. have been making and selling fruitcake since the 1980s. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)
  • Fruitcake orders are entered into the computer at Holy Cross Abbey in Berryville, Va. on Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2012. The monks here have been baking and selling fruitcake since the 1980s. The bake from January to September in order to allow at least six weeks of aging before shipping them out. The bulk of their orders come in for the holiday season. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)Fruitcake orders are entered into the computer at Holy Cross Abbey in Berryville, Va. on Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2012. The monks here have been baking and selling fruitcake since the 1980s. The bake from January to September in order to allow at least six weeks of aging before shipping them out. The bulk of their orders come in for the holiday season. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)
  • Ernie Polanskas, bakery manager at the Holy Cross Abbey bakery in Berryville, Va., holds one of the famous fruitcakes made by the monks on Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2012. He says that they use a recipe that they got from Betty Crocker back in the 1960s which they have tweaked a little over the years. Their fruitcake is two-thirds candied fruits and nuts, and he says this fact, along with the fact that they steam it while they bake it, keeps it really moist.  (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)Ernie Polanskas, bakery manager at the Holy Cross Abbey bakery in Berryville, Va., holds one of the famous fruitcakes made by the monks on Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2012. He says that they use a recipe that they got from Betty Crocker back in the 1960s which they have tweaked a little over the years. Their fruitcake is two-thirds candied fruits and nuts, and he says this fact, along with the fact that they steam it while they bake it, keeps it really moist. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)
  • The fruitcakes made by the monks at Holy Cross Abbey in Berryville, Va. are made with two-thirds candied fruits and nuts, meaning there is less cake batter to dry out. According to bakery manager Ernie Polanskas, the monks make about 10,000 fruitcakes from January to September, and ship most of them out during the Christmas season. He says they use an old Betty Crocker recipe that they have tweaked some over the years. It includes both sherry and brandy in addition to the candied fruits and walnuts. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)The fruitcakes made by the monks at Holy Cross Abbey in Berryville, Va. are made with two-thirds candied fruits and nuts, meaning there is less cake batter to dry out. According to bakery manager Ernie Polanskas, the monks make about 10,000 fruitcakes from January to September, and ship most of them out during the Christmas season. He says they use an old Betty Crocker recipe that they have tweaked some over the years. It includes both sherry and brandy in addition to the candied fruits and walnuts. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)
  • Slices of chocolate-covered fruitcake are packaged for sale at the Holy Cross Abbey in Berryville, Va. on Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2012. The monks spend January to September baking the fruitcakes, which they sell to support the day-to-day operations of the monastery. Christmastime is their busiest time of year in terms of orders; they generally ship out about 10,000 fruitcakes. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)Slices of chocolate-covered fruitcake are packaged for sale at the Holy Cross Abbey in Berryville, Va. on Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2012. The monks spend January to September baking the fruitcakes, which they sell to support the day-to-day operations of the monastery. Christmastime is their busiest time of year in terms of orders; they generally ship out about 10,000 fruitcakes. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)
  • A note indicates where to get fruitcakes for shipping out in the shipping room at the Holy Cross Abbey in Berryville, Va. on Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2012. The monks at the abbey have been baking and selling fruitcakes since the 1980s to support their monastery. Their busiest time of year is Christmas, when they get about 10,000 orders. They bake from January to September in order to allow at least six weeks of aging before shipping the fruitcakes out. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)A note indicates where to get fruitcakes for shipping out in the shipping room at the Holy Cross Abbey in Berryville, Va. on Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2012. The monks at the abbey have been baking and selling fruitcakes since the 1980s to support their monastery. Their busiest time of year is Christmas, when they get about 10,000 orders. They bake from January to September in order to allow at least six weeks of aging before shipping the fruitcakes out. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)
  • Brother Christopher Harmon puts shipping labels on boxes full of fruitcakes at the Holy Cross Abbey in Berryville, Va. on Monday, Nov. 19, 2012. The monks have been making fruitcakes for nearly 40 years and sell them as a means of making money for the day-to-day operations of the monastery.  (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)Brother Christopher Harmon puts shipping labels on boxes full of fruitcakes at the Holy Cross Abbey in Berryville, Va. on Monday, Nov. 19, 2012. The monks have been making fruitcakes for nearly 40 years and sell them as a means of making money for the day-to-day operations of the monastery. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)
  • Surrounded by boxes of packaged fruitcakes, Brother Christopher Harmon puts shipping labels on more boxes to be shipped from the Holy Cross Abbey in Berryville, Va. on Monday, Nov. 19, 2012. The monks have been making fruitcakes for nearly 40 years and sell them as a means of making money for the day-to-day operations of the monastery. They bake from January to September, with Christmas being their busiest shipping time of year. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)Surrounded by boxes of packaged fruitcakes, Brother Christopher Harmon puts shipping labels on more boxes to be shipped from the Holy Cross Abbey in Berryville, Va. on Monday, Nov. 19, 2012. The monks have been making fruitcakes for nearly 40 years and sell them as a means of making money for the day-to-day operations of the monastery. They bake from January to September, with Christmas being their busiest shipping time of year. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)
  • Brother Christopher Harmon ships fruitcakes from the Holy Cross Abbey in Berryville, Va. on Monday, Nov. 19, 2012. The monks have been making fruitcakes for nearly 40 years and sell them as a means of making money for the day-to-day operations of the monastery. They bake from January to September, with Christmas being their busiest shipping time of year. True to the nature of their order, they do as much by hand as possible. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)Brother Christopher Harmon ships fruitcakes from the Holy Cross Abbey in Berryville, Va. on Monday, Nov. 19, 2012. The monks have been making fruitcakes for nearly 40 years and sell them as a means of making money for the day-to-day operations of the monastery. They bake from January to September, with Christmas being their busiest shipping time of year. True to the nature of their order, they do as much by hand as possible. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)
  • Brother Christopher Harmon goes through the list of shipments that need to be made from the Holy Cross Abbey in Berryville, Va. on Monday, Nov. 19, 2012. The monks have been making fruitcakes for nearly 40 years and sells them as a means of making money for the day-to-day operations of the monastery. They bake from January to September, with Christmas being their busiest shipping time of year. They also sell creamed honey and truffles. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)Brother Christopher Harmon goes through the list of shipments that need to be made from the Holy Cross Abbey in Berryville, Va. on Monday, Nov. 19, 2012. The monks have been making fruitcakes for nearly 40 years and sells them as a means of making money for the day-to-day operations of the monastery. They bake from January to September, with Christmas being their busiest shipping time of year. They also sell creamed honey and truffles. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)
  • Brother Christopher Harmon ships fruitcakes from the Holy Cross Abbey in Berryville, Va. on Monday, Nov. 19, 2012. The monks have been making fruitcakes for nearly 40 years and sell them as a means of making money for the day-to-day operations of the monastery. They bake from January to September, with Christmas being their busiest shipping time of year. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)Brother Christopher Harmon ships fruitcakes from the Holy Cross Abbey in Berryville, Va. on Monday, Nov. 19, 2012. The monks have been making fruitcakes for nearly 40 years and sell them as a means of making money for the day-to-day operations of the monastery. They bake from January to September, with Christmas being their busiest shipping time of year. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)
  • A personalized note is added to one of the boxes of fruitcakes being shipped out by Holy Cross Abbey in Berryville, Va. on Monday, Nov. 19, 2012. The monks here bake some 10,000 fruitcakes a year, from January to September, and then ship them out primarily for the Christmas season. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)A personalized note is added to one of the boxes of fruitcakes being shipped out by Holy Cross Abbey in Berryville, Va. on Monday, Nov. 19, 2012. The monks here bake some 10,000 fruitcakes a year, from January to September, and then ship them out primarily for the Christmas season. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)
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Whether it’s a deep-seated hatred, cold-hearted humor or blind affection, no other food prompts as visceral a reaction as fruitcake.

It’s the gift that keeps getting re-gifted, a dish given wide berth at holiday dinner parties. It is the Brussels sprouts of the dessert world.

For some though, it’s a luxurious treat, one with a heady aroma and dense filling. The task of baking this marginally beloved cake falls to the monks of Holy Cross Abbey.

On a recent day in late November, the storeroom of the monastery’s bakery is stacked wall to wall and nearly floor to ceiling with thousands of boxed fruitcakes, proof that the cakes have a loyal following. Last year, the abbey sold about 10,000 cakes.

“Most people hate it because someone told them they hate it,” said Ernie Polanskas, the monastery’s head fruitcake baker. “The bad ones are the inexpensive ones at the grocery that are shaped like a brick and are mostly made of cake that dries out.”

Nestled in the rolling hills of Berryville, Va., the 62-year-old monastery occupies a cluster of unassuming buildings on an old farm called Cold Springs.

About 30 men live and work on the property and a retreat house set on its edge has a rotating number of visitors looking to get away from everyday life.

Mr. Polanskas has been with the abbey for 12 years, but he is not a monk.

He jokingly recalls how he was “recruited” with the offer of running the abbey’s gift store. When he arrived, he was told that the monks also needed someone to head the bakery.

The monks at Holy Cross Abbey have spent decades perfecting a recipe — one based on Betty Crocker’s directions — which puts them on a short list of reputable fruitcake bakers on the East Coast.

“The fruit and nuts are the things that keep the cake moist,” Mr. Polanskas explained. “You can make it at any time. The longer it sits, the better it is.”

A customer once called to tell the monks she had found an unopened cake in its tin, beneath the bed of a recently deceased relative.

It was 13 years old, Mr. Polanskas said, but only “a little dry.”

A durable product that can handle a flexible schedule is just what the monks were looking for when they realized baking bread, which was their previous way to make a living, was too much trouble.

The monks had to worry about the bread not being fresh or delivered on time, which impacted sales. But they had an industrial-sized oven and the monks turned to a tried-and-true product they’d been baking for special occasions — fruitcake.

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