Egyptian Islamists rally for Shariah law

  • An Egyptian Muslim man holds the Quran, Islam's holy book, during a Nov. 9, 2012, rally in Tahrir Square in Cairo. Thousands of ultraconservative Muslims rallied in the Egyptian capital, demanding the country's new constitution be based on the rulings of Islamic law, or Shariah. (Associated Press)An Egyptian Muslim man holds the Quran, Islam's holy book, during a Nov. 9, 2012, rally in Tahrir Square in Cairo. Thousands of ultraconservative Muslims rallied in the Egyptian capital, demanding the country's new constitution be based on the rulings of Islamic law, or Shariah. (Associated Press)
  • Egyptian Muslims gather during a Nov. 9, 2012, rally in Tahrir Square in Cairo. Thousands of ultraconservative Muslims rallied in the Egyptian capital, demanding the country's new constitution be based on the rulings of Islamic law, or Shariah. (Associated Press)Egyptian Muslims gather during a Nov. 9, 2012, rally in Tahrir Square in Cairo. Thousands of ultraconservative Muslims rallied in the Egyptian capital, demanding the country's new constitution be based on the rulings of Islamic law, or Shariah. (Associated Press)
  • An Egyptian Muslim child prays during a Nov. 9, 2012, rally in Tahrir Square in Cairo. Thousands of ultraconservative Muslims rallied in the Egyptian capital, demanding the country's new constitution be based on the rulings of Islamic law, or Shariah. (Associated Press) The boy's headband reads, in Arabic, "anything but God's messenger." (Associated Press)An Egyptian Muslim child prays during a Nov. 9, 2012, rally in Tahrir Square in Cairo. Thousands of ultraconservative Muslims rallied in the Egyptian capital, demanding the country's new constitution be based on the rulings of Islamic law, or Shariah. (Associated Press) The boy's headband reads, in Arabic, "anything but God's messenger." (Associated Press)
  • Egyptian Muslims pray a Nov. 9, 2012, rally in Tahrir Square in Cairo. Thousands of ultraconservative Muslims rallied in the Egyptian capital, demanding the country's new constitution be based on the rulings of Islamic law, or Shariah. The poster on the the motor scooter reads in Arabic, "Islamic law is the first source of the constitution." (Associated Press)Egyptian Muslims pray a Nov. 9, 2012, rally in Tahrir Square in Cairo. Thousands of ultraconservative Muslims rallied in the Egyptian capital, demanding the country's new constitution be based on the rulings of Islamic law, or Shariah. The poster on the the motor scooter reads in Arabic, "Islamic law is the first source of the constitution." (Associated Press)
  • Egyptian Muslims pray during a Nov. 9, 2012, rally in Tahrir Square in Cairo. Thousands of ultraconservative Muslims rallied in the Egyptian capital, demanding the country's new constitution be based on the rulings of Islamic law, or Shariah. (Associated Press)Egyptian Muslims pray during a Nov. 9, 2012, rally in Tahrir Square in Cairo. Thousands of ultraconservative Muslims rallied in the Egyptian capital, demanding the country's new constitution be based on the rulings of Islamic law, or Shariah. (Associated Press)
  • Egyptian Muslims shout Islamic slogans during a Nov. 9, 2012, rally in Tahrir Square in Cairo. Thousands of ultraconservative Muslims rallied in the Egyptian capital, demanding the country's new constitution be based on the rulings of Islamic law, or Shariah. (Associated Press)Egyptian Muslims shout Islamic slogans during a Nov. 9, 2012, rally in Tahrir Square in Cairo. Thousands of ultraconservative Muslims rallied in the Egyptian capital, demanding the country's new constitution be based on the rulings of Islamic law, or Shariah. (Associated Press)
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Mohammed, like many of those protesting Friday, is a member of a party set up by the Gamaa Islamiya, once the country’s largest militant group that has since renounced violence.

Protesters waved the black Islamist flag and the Egyptian flag, and held traditional Friday prayers in the square after a sermon by conservative preacher, Mohammed al-Sagheer.

“My brothers, the Egyptian people love God, the Prophet (Muhammad) and the Kaaba,” he said, referring to the cube-shaped structure in Mecca toward which Muslims pray five times a day.

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