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The lawsuit gives seven examples of mortgages made for homes in California, Alabama, Florida and Georgia in which the borrowers’ income and other qualifications were falsified.

For example, one loan application, for a home in Miami, said that the borrower was an airline sales representative earning $15,500 per month, when the borrower worked for a temp agency and earned $2,666 per month. The borrower defaulted within seven months, the suit said.

A loan application for a home in Birmingham, Ala., failed to disclose $81,000 in debt that the borrower was carrying. That borrower defaulted within a year, the suit said.

The lawsuit accused Countrywide, and later Bank of America, of selling thousands of Hustle loans to Fannie and Freddie. The lawsuit says that that the Hustle program continued through 2009.

According to the lawsuit, Fannie and Freddie don’t review loans before they purchased them. Instead, they relied on banks‘ statements that the loans met certain qualifications.

Bharara said the lawsuit was the first civil fraud suit brought by the Justice Department concerning loans later sold to Fannie and Freddie. When Fannie and Freddie collapsed, investors were wiped out.

Taxpayers have spent $170 billion to keep Fannie and Freddie afloat, and it could cost $260 billion more to support the companies through 2014 after subtracting dividend payments to taxpayers, according to the government.

The lawsuit says that Fannie and Freddie suffered $1 billion in losses because they had to pay for Countrywide’s defaulted loans. The lawsuit also complains that Bank of America is refusing to buy back mortgages “even where the loans admittedly contained material defects or even fraudulent misrepresentations.”

Bank of America’s purchase of Countrywide originally earned it plaudits from lawmakers because Bank of America was viewed as stepping in to eliminate a bad actor from the mortgage market.

But the purchase, instead of padding Bank of America’s mortgage business, has drawn a drumbeat of regulatory fines, lawsuits and losses.

Bank of America reported last week that while it is issuing more mortgages — $21 billion worth last quarter, up 18 percent from a year earlier — its mortgage unit is still losing money as the bank works through crisis-era problems.

In the past year and a half, Bharara’s office has settled lawsuits against CitiMortgage, Flagstar Bank and Deutsche Bank over mortgages. Its lawsuits against Wells Fargo and Allied Home Mortgage are pending.