- - Sunday, October 7, 2012

NEW YORK

NEW YORK — A former manager at the Sept. 11 Memorial was fired for raising health and security concerns at one of the most security-conscious places in the world, he said in a lawsuit filed last week.

As facilities director, Thomas Cancelliere alerted his bosses that the water in the memorial’s signature fountains carried illness-causing bacteria, the exit gates were too narrow and could hinder an evacuation, and there were no security checks at a public parking garage directly below the off-site room where the memorial’s millions of visitors are screened, the lawsuit said.

“Unfortunately, Mr. Cancelliere’s concern for the safety of visitors was not shared by his supervisors,” who told him the issues weren’t his responsibility or were being addressed, even though they weren’t, the lawsuit said.

The National Sept. 11 Memorial and Museum said his claims are baseless and Mr. Cancelliere was fired because he failed to meet job requirements.

NEW JERSEY

Gunman in attack on parked car still free after killing two

CAMDEN — A masked man carrying a gun and a machete entered a parked car and opened fire on five young adults inside, killing the driver and a passenger and wounding the others, then pushed aside the driver’s body and drove off with four of the victims inside, authorities said.

The attack was a startling burst of violence even for a city consistently ranked as one of the nation’s most dangerous. It was not clear whether the gunman knew anyone in the car or what sparked the shooting late Saturday, Camden County prosecutor’s spokesman Jason Laughlin said.

The gunman eventually fled and remained at large Sunday, authorities said. He was described as Hispanic and about 6 feet tall. He wore a black mask over the lower part of his face and yellow latex gloves.

All three wounded victims remained in the hospital Sunday, two in critical condition.

CALIFORNIA

Three hurt as commuter train hits truck stalled on track

SANTA CLARITA — A commuter train carrying more than 200 passengers struck a semi that was stalled on the tracks in northern Los Angeles County, leaving three people with minor injuries, authorities said.

The crash involving Metrolink Train No. 271 and the truck hauling automobiles occurred at about 9:30 p.m. Saturday in the Newhall district of Santa Clarita, according to Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Deputy Joshua Dubin.

The semi driver was able to get out of the truck before the crash on Pine Street, just south of Newhall Avenue in Old Town Newhall.

Three of the train’s 220 passengers had minor injuries and were treated at a hospital, Deputy Dubin said. No one else was hurt. The train did not derail but remained at the scene.

A Metrolink passenger told KHTS-AM in Santa Clarita that he didn’t feel an impact, but the effect was as if the train’s driver suddenly slammed on the brakes.

“It was just kind of a hard stop,” the passenger said.

FLORIDA

Commercial supply rocket launch successful, on way to Space Station

CAPE CANAVERAL — A commercial supply ship is on its way to the International Space Station.

The California-based SpaceX launched its unmanned Falcon rocket from Cape Canaveral on Sunday night. Aboard the rocket was a Dragon capsule holding 1,000 pounds of cargo, including chocolate-vanilla swirl ice cream for the three station residents.

This is the first Dragon launch under a $1.6 billion contract between SpaceX and NASA. The contract calls for 12 resupply missions.

A Dragon flew to the space station in May, but it was a test, so nothing vital was aboard. The newest Dragon is hauling key experiments and other vital gear.

Dragon will reach the orbiting lab Wednesday. It will remain docked for nearly three weeks before returning to Earth with an even bigger load.

ARIZONA

Border Patrol union confirms agent’s death as friendly fire

PHOENIX — The head of the Border Patrol agents union says the agent killed last week in a shooting in southern Arizona apparently opened fire on two fellow agents thinking they were armed smugglers and was killed when they returned fire.

National Border Patrol Council President George McCubbin said Sunday that the two sets of agents approached an area where a sensor had been activated. He says they arrived from different directions early Tuesday when Agent Nicholas Ivie opened fire.

Acting Cochise County Sheriff Rod Rothrock confirmed the scenario but would not say whether Ivie was the first to shoot. The FBI announced Friday that the shooting appeared to be a case of friendly fire.

The shooting happened a few miles north of the border with Mexico, in a well-known smuggling area.

From wire dispatches and staff reports

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