U.S. ambassador to Libya killed in attack

  • **FILE** Yemeni demonstrators climb the gates of the U.S. Embassy in Sanaa, Yemen, on Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012, during a protest against a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad. (Associated Press)**FILE** Yemeni demonstrators climb the gates of the U.S. Embassy in Sanaa, Yemen, on Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012, during a protest against a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad. (Associated Press)
  • A riot policeman passes a burning vehicle during clashes outside the U.S. embassy in Cairo early Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012, as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad. (Associated Press)A riot policeman passes a burning vehicle during clashes outside the U.S. embassy in Cairo early Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012, as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad. (Associated Press)
  • **FILE** Palestinians burn a U.S. flag during a protest against the movie, "Innocence of Muslims," near the United Nations office in Gaza City, Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012. Muslim anger over perceived Western insults to Islam has exploded several times, most recently in Tuesday's attacks against U.S. diplomatic posts in the Middle East in which U.S. ambassador to Libya Chris Stevens and three other Americans were killed. (AP Photo/Adel Hana)**FILE** Palestinians burn a U.S. flag during a protest against the movie, "Innocence of Muslims," near the United Nations office in Gaza City, Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012. Muslim anger over perceived Western insults to Islam has exploded several times, most recently in Tuesday's attacks against U.S. diplomatic posts in the Middle East in which U.S. ambassador to Libya Chris Stevens and three other Americans were killed. (AP Photo/Adel Hana)
  • Egyptian protesters carry their national flag and a flag with Arabic that reads "No God but Allah, and Mohammed is his prophet," and chant anti-U.S. slogans during a demonstration in front of the U.S. Embassy in Cairo on Sept. 12, 2012, as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's prophet Muhammad. (Associated Press)Egyptian protesters carry their national flag and a flag with Arabic that reads "No God but Allah, and Mohammed is his prophet," and chant anti-U.S. slogans during a demonstration in front of the U.S. Embassy in Cairo on Sept. 12, 2012, as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's prophet Muhammad. (Associated Press)
  • **FILE** U.S. envoy Chris Stevens (center), accompanied by British envoy Christopher Prentice (left), speaks April 11, 2011, to Council member for Misrata Dr. Suleiman Fortia (right) at the Tibesty Hotel where an African Union delegation was meeting with opposition leaders in Benghazi, Libya. (Associated Press)**FILE** U.S. envoy Chris Stevens (center), accompanied by British envoy Christopher Prentice (left), speaks April 11, 2011, to Council member for Misrata Dr. Suleiman Fortia (right) at the Tibesty Hotel where an African Union delegation was meeting with opposition leaders in Benghazi, Libya. (Associated Press)
  • ** FILE ** Libyans walk on the grounds of the gutted U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, after an attack that killed four Americans, including U.S. Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens, on Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012. (AP Photo/Ibrahim Alaguri)

** FILE ** Libyans walk on the grounds of the gutted U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, after an attack that killed four Americans, including U.S. Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens, on Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012. (AP Photo/Ibrahim Alaguri)
  • Glass, debris and overturned furniture are strewn inside a room in the gutted U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, on Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012, after an attack the previous day killed four Americans, including Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens. (AP Photo/Ibrahim Alaguri)

Glass, debris and overturned furniture are strewn inside a room in the gutted U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, on Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012, after an attack the previous day killed four Americans, including Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens. (AP Photo/Ibrahim Alaguri)
  • A man looks at documents at the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, after an attack that killed four Americans, including Ambassador Chris Stevens, Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012. The graffiti reads, "no God but God," "God is great," and "Muhammad is the Prophet." The American ambassador to Libya and three other Americans were killed when a mob of protesters and gunmen overwhelmed the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, setting fire to it in outrage over a film that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad. (AP Photo/Ibrahim Alaguri)

A man looks at documents at the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, after an attack that killed four Americans, including Ambassador Chris Stevens, Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012. The graffiti reads, "no God but God," "God is great," and "Muhammad is the Prophet." The American ambassador to Libya and three other Americans were killed when a mob of protesters and gunmen overwhelmed the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, setting fire to it in outrage over a film that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad. (AP Photo/Ibrahim Alaguri)
  • Libyans walk on the grounds of the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, after an attack that killed four Americans, including Ambassador Chris Stevens, Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012. (AP Photo/Ibrahim Alaguri)

Libyans walk on the grounds of the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, after an attack that killed four Americans, including Ambassador Chris Stevens, Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012. (AP Photo/Ibrahim Alaguri)
  • ** FILE ** Libyans gather at the gutted U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, after an attack that killed four Americans, including Ambassador Chris Stevens, Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012. (AP Photo/Ibrahim Alaguri)

** FILE ** Libyans gather at the gutted U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, after an attack that killed four Americans, including Ambassador Chris Stevens, Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012. (AP Photo/Ibrahim Alaguri)
  • Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton listens as President Obama speaks Sept. 12, 2012, in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington on the death of Christopher Stevens, U.S. ambassador to Libya. (Associated Press)Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton listens as President Obama speaks Sept. 12, 2012, in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington on the death of Christopher Stevens, U.S. ambassador to Libya. (Associated Press)
  • President Obama, followed by Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, walks to meet with State Department personnel in the courtyard of the State Department in Washington, Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012, after speaking at the White House concerning the recent deaths of Americans in Libya. (Associated Press)President Obama, followed by Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, walks to meet with State Department personnel in the courtyard of the State Department in Washington, Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012, after speaking at the White House concerning the recent deaths of Americans in Libya. (Associated Press)
  • Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney makes comments on the killing of U.S. diplomatic officials in Benghazi, Libya, while speaking in Jacksonville, Fla., on Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney makes comments on the killing of U.S. diplomatic officials in Benghazi, Libya, while speaking in Jacksonville, Fla., on Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
  • Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney makes comments Sept. 12, 2012, while speaking in Jacksonville, Fla., on the killing of U.S. Embassy officials in Benghazi, Libya. (Associated Press)Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney makes comments Sept. 12, 2012, while speaking in Jacksonville, Fla., on the killing of U.S. Embassy officials in Benghazi, Libya. (Associated Press)
  • Protesters destroy an American flag pulled down from the U.S. embassy in Cairo, Egypt, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2012. Egyptian protesters, largely ultra conservative Islamists, have climbed the walls of the U.S. embassy in Cairo, went into the courtyard and brought down the flag, replacing it with a black flag with Islamic inscription, in protest of a film deemed offensive of Islam. (AP Photo/Mohammed Abu Zaid)Protesters destroy an American flag pulled down from the U.S. embassy in Cairo, Egypt, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2012. Egyptian protesters, largely ultra conservative Islamists, have climbed the walls of the U.S. embassy in Cairo, went into the courtyard and brought down the flag, replacing it with a black flag with Islamic inscription, in protest of a film deemed offensive of Islam. (AP Photo/Mohammed Abu Zaid)
  • Egyptian soldiers stand guard in front of the U.S. embassy in Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012. An Israeli filmmaker based in California went into hiding after his movie attacking Islam's prophet Muhammad sparked angry assaults by ultra-conservative Muslims in Egypt. Arabic on the wall reads, "anyone but God's prophet." (AP Photo/Nasser Nasser)Egyptian soldiers stand guard in front of the U.S. embassy in Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012. An Israeli filmmaker based in California went into hiding after his movie attacking Islam's prophet Muhammad sparked angry assaults by ultra-conservative Muslims in Egypt. Arabic on the wall reads, "anyone but God's prophet." (AP Photo/Nasser Nasser)
  • An Egyptian woman holds a black flag with Islamic inscription in Arabic that reads, "No God but Allah, and Mohammed is his prophet," in front of the U.S. embassy in Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012. An Israeli filmmaker based in California went into hiding after his movie attacking Islam's prophet Muhammad sparked angry assaults by ultra-conservative Muslims in Egypt. (AP Photo/Nasser Nasser)

An Egyptian woman holds a black flag with Islamic inscription in Arabic that reads, "No God but Allah, and Mohammed is his prophet," in front of the U.S. embassy in Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012. An Israeli filmmaker based in California went into hiding after his movie attacking Islam's prophet Muhammad sparked angry assaults by ultra-conservative Muslims in Egypt. (AP Photo/Nasser Nasser)
  • Palestinians protest against the movie, "Innocence of Muslims," near the United Nations office in Gaza City, Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012. (AP Photo/Adel Hana)

Palestinians protest against the movie, "Innocence of Muslims," near the United Nations office in Gaza City, Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012. (AP Photo/Adel Hana)

The U.S. ambassador to Libya and three other Americans were killed after armed men stormed the U.S. diplomatic mission in the eastern city of Benghazi on Tuesday.

Ambassador Chris Stevens died from injuries sustained in the attack.

President Obama confirmed Mr. Stevens death on Wednesday morning and in a statement condemned what he described as an outrageous attack.

The mob in Benghazi was angry over a video reportedly produced in the U.S., which they said was insulting to Islam’s prophet, Muhammad.

“I strongly condemn the outrageous attack on our diplomatic facility in Benghazi, which took the lives of four Americans, including Ambassador Chris Stevens,” Mr. Obama said.

The victims “exemplified America’s commitment to freedom, justice, and partnership with nations and people around the globe, and stand in stark contrast to those who callously took their lives,” he added.

Mr. Stevens had run the U.S. mission in Benghazi after the revolution against Moammar Gadhafi’s regime erupted in February of last year. He was confirmed as ambassador to Libya by the Senate earlier this year.

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton identified one of the other victims as Foreign Service Information Management Officer, Sean Smith. The family of the other two victims were yet to be informed of their deaths.
Mr. Stevens died from injuries sustained in the attack on the diplomatic mission.

Mr. Stevens “spoke eloquently about his passion for service, for diplomacy and for the Libyan people,” Mrs. Clinton said.

“As the conflict in Libya unfolded, Chris was one of the first Americans on the ground in Benghazi,” she added. “He risked his own life to lend the Libyan people a helping hand to build the foundation for a new, free nation.”
Mr. Smith, a father of two, joined the State Department 10 years ago.

Before Benghazi, he served in Baghdad, Pretoria, Montreal, and most recently The Hague.

“Like Chris, Sean was one of our best,” Mrs. Clinton said.

“All the Americans we lost in yesterday’s attacks made the ultimate sacrifice,” she added. “We condemn this vicious and violent attack that took their lives, which they had committed to helping the Libyan people reach for a better future.”

Libyan Deputy Prime Minister Mustafa Abushagur in a Twitter posting said this was an attack on “America, Libya and free people everywhere.”

NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh-Rasmussen also condemned the attack in Benghazi. “Such violence can never be justified,” he said.

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About the Author
Ashish Kumar Sen

Ashish Kumar Sen

Ashish Kumar Sen is a reporter covering foreign policy and international developments for The Washington Times.

Prior to joining The Times, Mr. Sen worked for publications in Asia and the Middle East. His work has appeared in a number of publications and online news sites including the British Broadcasting Corp., Asia Times Online and Outlook magazine.

 

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