Briefly: Terrorists targeted Indonesian police in ‘holy war’

Question of the Day

Is it still considered bad form to talk politics during a social gathering?

View results

Indonesia

JAKARTA — Six men associated with an Islamic school founded by a radical cleric plotted to set off bombs and shoot police to wage “holy war” in an Indonesian town, one of the suspects said in an interrogation video released by police Thursday.

Two suspected militants and a member of an elite anti-terrorism squad were killed Aug. 31 when police raided the group in Central Java. Bayu Setiono, 22, was arrested during the raid, another man was arrested Wednesday and two suspects are at large.

The group is accused of killing a police officer last week and attacking two police posts in mid-August as part of the plot in the town of Solo.

In the 10-minute video released at police headquarters, Setiono said, “We planned to kill policemen for the sake of upholding Islamic Shariah and the establishment of a caliphate in Indonesia.

“Our targets, since 2007 until now, are infidels and policemen.”

India

Kashmir rejects DNA on unidentified bodies

SRINAGAR — The government of Kashmir has rejected wide-scale DNA testing of bodies in thousands of unmarked graves, despite pleas by the families of those who disappeared during two decades of fighting in the restive region.

A report by the state’s home department obtained by the Associated Press insisted that all those buried in the graves were militants. The report added that if families wanted DNA tests, they would have to identify both the graveyard and the exact grave where they think the disappeared relative was buried.

The random collection of DNA from the graves would be an “academic exercise” that would “hurt the local sentiments,” the report said.

Khurram Parvez, an official with the local Association of Parents of Disappeared Persons, criticized the report as “yet another attempt by the government to obfuscate the truth and sustain impunity.”

The report was a response to a three-year investigation by the state-run Human Rights Commission, confirming last year that 38 burial sites in the north of the Himalayan territory contained 2,156 unidentified bodies. The commission said 574 other bodies found in the graves were identified as local residents, and it urged widespread DNA testing.

North Korea

North claims U.N. sides with United States

Story Continues →

View Entire Story
Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus
TWT Video Picks