Army to cut up to 4,000 captains and majors

19,000 to appear before screening board for early separation

Paratroopers are from the 173rd Airborne Brigade Combat Team. (Twitter, U.S. Army)Paratroopers are from the 173rd Airborne Brigade Combat Team. (Twitter, U.S. Army)
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The U.S. Army is sending roughly 19,000 active-duty captains and majors to a screening board for early separation this spring, the Army Times reported. Up to 20 percent of those screened — approximately 3,800 officers — could be scheduled to leave the service by the Officer Separation Board and Enhanced Selective Early Retirement Board.

Officers with fewer than 18 years of federal active service will have their screening process done by OSB, and those with more than 18 years of service will see the E-SERB, according to the Army Times.

“The Army’s drawdown plan is a balanced approach while maintaining readiness and reducing turbulence to the officer corps,” said David Martino, director of the Officer Personnel Management Directorate at Human Resources Command. “We know the Officer Separation Board and Enhanced Selective Early Retirement Board will separate fully qualified officers who have rendered quality service to the nation. We’ll execute [the boards] with precision, care and compassion.”

Some officers may choose to respond to their early separation from active-duty by transitioning to the Army Reserve or National Guard, if possible. Those who do not may have to deal with retirement benefits that are less than than they had anticipated.

“Officers with 18 or more years of service who are selected for separation will be allowed to serve until the first day of the first month of their 20th year of active federal service, earning them full retirement benefits, said Hillary Baxter, chief of the leader development division at HRC,” the Army Times reported.

Those officers with over 15 years of service who leave before their 20th year of active service will receive the same benefits as those who served two decades, but at a reduced pay rate.

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