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Andrew P. Napolitano

Andrew P. Napolitano

Andrew P. Napolitano, a former judge of the Superior Court of New Jersey, is an analyst for the Fox News Channel. He has written seven books on the U.S. Constitution.

Articles by Andrew P. Napolitano

Illustration on a Trump/Mueller interview by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Interviewing the president

When federal prosecutors are nearing the end of criminal investigations, they often invite the subjects of those investigations to speak with them. Published August 8, 2018

Rudy as da Bomb Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Trump sabotaged by his own lawyer

In the past week, former New York Mayor Rudolph Giuliani, now the chief lawyer and principal spokesman for President Donald Trump's legal team, has offered arguments more harmful to Mr. Trump than helpful. In a series of combative, disjointed and logically challenged television rants, Mr. Giuliani has essentially argued that Mr. Trump did not engage in any conspiracy with the Russians for them to provide help to his campaign and that even if he did, it wasn't criminal. Published August 1, 2018

Andrew Alexander Napolitano      Photo courtesy the Napolitano family

An American life

Last week, in Ridgewood, New Jersey, a 92-year-old unsung American patriot lost his battle with congestive heart failure. He had been surrounded by his wife and children and their spouses and their children. He left this vale of tears in his wife's arms, peacefully and with dignity. Published July 25, 2018

Shrewd Card Player Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

In defense of Trump with Putin

As a trial judge in New Jersey during the Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush years, I spent much of my time trying to settle cases. This process involved bringing into my chambers the lawyers for the disputants and asking them in the absence of their adversaries to lay their cards on the table. Published July 18, 2018

Illustration on nominating from the swamp by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Filling, instead of draining, the swamp

When Donald Trump started running for the Republican nomination for president in June 2015, he began by attacking the Republican establishment in Washington, and he began his attack by calling the establishment "the swamp." Published July 11, 2018

Illustration on the impact of the Declaration of Independence by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The values underlying Independence Day

The Declaration of Independence — which was signed on July 3, 1776, for public release on July 4 — was Thomas Jefferson's masterpiece. Jefferson himself wrote much about the declaration in the 50 years that followed. Published July 4, 2018

FILE - In this Sept. 9, 2014, file photo, cars wait to enter Fort Bliss in El Paso, Texas. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security has formally requested space for up to 12,000 beds at a military base to detain families caught crossing the border illegally, two Trump administration officials said Wednesday, June 27, 2018. The facility will be housed at a military base, but it's not clear yet which one. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis said that two bases had been identified to house migrants: Goodfellow Air Force Base near San Angelo, Texas, and Fort Bliss.  (AP Photo/Juan Carlos Llorca, File)

Protecting due process

Last weekend, President Trump argued that those foreigners who enter the United States unlawfully should simply be taken to the border, escorted across it and let go. According to the president, this would save precious government resources, avoid the business of separating children from their parents and free up the Border Patrol and other federal assets to do their jobs. Published June 27, 2018

The FBI's J. Edgar Hoover Headquarters, across the street from the Justice Department in Washington, Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2016. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

How to keep the Federal Bureau of Investigation independent

When President Donald Trump appointed Atlanta lawyer Christopher Wray to succeed James Comey as the director of the FBI, my initial reaction was not positive. Mr. Wray is a veteran of the Department of Justice and is part of that good-old-boy DOJ network that knows how to protect its own. Indeed, when New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, a former U.S. attorney, needed a good criminal defense lawyer — whose millions in fees were paid by New Jersey taxpayers — he hired Mr. Wray. Published June 20, 2018

Illustration n Congressional meddling with the Justice Department by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

More assaults on the rule of law

Amid all the happy hoopla over President Donald Trump's trip to Singapore, where he began the process for what he hopes will be the normalization of relations between the United States and North Korea and the denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula, has come an effort by the House Intelligence Committee to interfere with the criminal investigation of the president. Published June 13, 2018

Gas on the Fire Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Can Trump shoot James Comey?

Last weekend, the White House leaked a copy of a letter sent by President Donald Trump's legal team on Jan. 29 to special counsel Robert Mueller. The letter set forth the president's legal strategy, arguing essentially that he is immune from prosecution for any crime. Published June 6, 2018

Illustration on trump's attacks on the Mueller investigation by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Giuliani's unwarranted attack on the Trump investigation

This past weekend, President Trump and the most visible member of his legal team, former New York Mayor Rudolph Giuliani, fired up their campaign against special counsel Robert Mueller. They attacked people at the Department of Justice (DOJ) whom Mr. Trump appointed. They smeared career DOJ lawyers and FBI agents by offering allegations without showing any supporting evidence. And they purported to challenge the legitimacy of Mr. Mueller's office itself. Published May 30, 2018

In this May 16, 2013 file photo, FBI Director Robert Mueller testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington before the Senate Appropriations, Commerce, Justice, Science subcommittee hearing on the fiscal 2014 budget request for the FBI.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

The danger of investigating the investigators

This past weekend, President Trump suggested that his presidential campaign may have been the victim of spies or moles who were FBI informants or undercover agents. He demanded an investigation to get to the bottom of the matter. Published May 23, 2018

In this Monday, May 14, 2018 photo, people make bets in the sports book at the South Point hotel and casino in Las Vegas. Now that the U.S. Supreme Court has cleared the way for states to legalize sports betting, the race is on to see who will referee the multi-billion-dollar business expected to emerge from the decision.  (AP Photo/John Locher) **FILE**

'Bill Bradley, call your bookie'

In 1992, Congress passed a statute authored by Sen. Bill Bradley of New Jersey, who was a former Princeton University and New York Knicks basketball superstar, prohibiting the states from authorizing sports betting. At that time, gambling in Atlantic City was flourishing, and notwithstanding one of its own senators' efforts to keep gambling away from competitive sports, the state of New Jersey wanted to duplicate Las Vegas' success with sports betting. Published May 16, 2018

FILE - In this May 16, 2013 file photo, FBI Director Robert Mueller testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington before the Senate Appropriations, Commerce, Justice, Science subcommittee hearing on the fiscal 2014 budget request for the FBI. Mueller is nearing the end of his 12 years as head of the law enforcement agency that is conducting high-profile investigations of the Boston Marathon bombings, the attacks in Benghazi, Libya, that killed four Americans and leaks of classified government information. On Thursday, June 13, 2013, Mueller was to undergo questioning by the House Judiciary Committee on these and other issues in what will be his final appearance before the panel. His last day on the job is Sept. 4. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

Prosecutors and the rule of law

Late last week, a federal judge in Alexandria, Va., questioned the authority of special counsel Robert Mueller to seek an indictment and pursue the prosecution of former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort for alleged financial crimes that, according to the indictment, began and ended well before Donald Trump ran for president. Published May 9, 2018

President Donald Trump arrives to present Mandy Manning, a teacher at the Newcomer Center at Joel E. Ferris High School in Spokane, Wash., with the National Teacher of the Year award during the National Teacher of the Year reception in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Wednesday, May 2, 2018. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Troublesome questions for President Trump

In a startling revelation earlier this week, The New York Times published what it claims are 40 questions that special counsel Robert Mueller sent to lawyers for President Donald Trump. The questions are apparently a road map of inquiry that Mr. Mueller and his prosecutors and FBI agents plan to put to the president if the president agrees to sit down for an interview with them. Published May 2, 2018

Bombing of Syria Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

At war and with the separation of powers

A popular way to begin the first day of class in constitutional law in many American law schools is to ask the students what sets the U.S. Constitution apart from all others. Published April 25, 2018

President Donald Trump gestures during a news conference with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at Trump's private Mar-a-Lago club, Wednesday, April 18, 2018, in Palm Beach, Fla. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Trump and the attorney-client privilege

A few weeks ago, President Trump was an outwardly happy man because of the utterance of one solitary word from the lips of special counsel Robert Mueller to one of Mr. Trump's lawyers. The word that thrilled the president and his legal team was "subject." Published April 18, 2018

Swamp Cannon Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The real threat to Trump

In the midst of worrying about North Korea, Syria and Democrats taking control of the House of Representatives this fall, President Donald Trump is now worrying about a government assault on his own business, which targeted his own lawyer. Published April 11, 2018

The Mueller Search Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

What is Robert Mueller looking for?

Robert Mueller is the special counsel appointed by Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein in May 2017 to probe the nature and extent of Russian interference in the 2016 presidential campaign. The investigation began in October 2016 under President Barack Obama when the FBI took seriously the boast of Carter Page, one of candidate Donald Trump's foreign policy advisers, that he had worked for the Kremlin. Published April 4, 2018

In a Saturday, March 24, 2018 photo, Stephanie Smullen of Green Bay helps her 2-year-old son, Willis, give the Easter Bunny a high-five during the Beja Shriners' Breakfast with the Easter Bunny event in Howard, Wis. (Sarah Kloepping/Herald-Times Reporter via AP)

Hope for the dead

What is the connection between personal freedom and rising from the dead? Published March 28, 2018