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He is No. 66 in the world, and a good showing could help him crack the top 50 and get into next World Golf Championship at Doral, and possibly work his way to Augusta.

“There’s a lot of points to play for,” Jacobson said. “Any week if you play well or have a really good week, you’re going to make a jump. Obviously, a week where you’re getting a chance to play it’s going to make a difference. It’s another opportunity. It’s a good time in the year for me to get to play quite a bit of golf.”

Jacobson has played the Match Play twice, both times when it was at La Costa. He lost to Tiger Woods in the third round in 2004, and to Chad Campbell in the opening round the following year.

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BRITISH OPEN CHANGES: Players no longer will have to figure out special money lists to determine whether they can get into the British Open.

The Royal & Ancient made a few tweaks to its qualifying process this year. Instead of a special money list on the PGA Tour and European Tour, that has been eliminated in favor of additional spots on their money lists much closer to the Open.

A year ago, three spots were available from the FedEx Cup standings after the Colonial in May. Two spots were available from a special money list that consisted of The Players Championship and five tournaments through the Greenbrier Classic. Now, the special money list is gone and five spots will be available from the FedEx Cup standings after the Greenbrier.

The same applies to the European Tour.

There is one other change. A year ago, the leading player (not already eligible) from the top five at the French Open, Scottish Open, Greenbrier and John Deere Classic got into the Open. This year, only the winner from the Scottish Open and John Deere get in.

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CHOI AWARD: K.J. Choi has been selected to receive the Charlie Bartlett Award from the Golf Writers Association of America, which honors a professional golfer for unselfish contributions for the betterment of society.

The 42-year-old from South Korea founded the K.J. Choi Foundation in 2007 to help children and communities break the cycle of hopelessness and achieve their dreams. His reach has extended to scholarships and global aid for hurricane and tsunami victims.

“I would like to thank all of those who have supported me,” Choi said. “Without them, I would never have been able to be in a position to be helping others. Although I feel that I haven’t done that much, I am honored to be recognized for my actions. This is the first award of any sort that I have received during my 13-year career on the PGA Tour and I feel that much honored to be receiving an award for my charitable actions rather than my play.”

His eight wins include The Players Championship _ he donated $200,000 of his paycheck to victims of the tornadoes that hit the southeastern U.S. that year _ and Choi has played on three Presidents Cup teams.

He will be honored April 10 at the GWAA Annual Awards Dinner in Augusta, Ga.

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