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“We sincerely apologize for the incident,” Superdome spokesman Eric Eagan said.

Once the game resumed, CBS said all commercial commitments for the broadcast were being honored. The network sold out its allotment of advertising at $3.8 million per 30-second spot.

“We lost numerous cameras and some audio powered by sources in the Superdome,” said Jennifer Sabatelle, vice president of communications for CBS Sports. “We utilized CBS’ backup power and at no time did we leave the air.”

The outage provided a major glitch to what has largely been viewed as a smooth week for New Orleans, which was hosting its first Super Bowl since 2002 and was eager to show off how the city has rebuilt since Hurricane Katrina.

Monique Richard, who is from the north shore of Lake Pontchartrain, had tickets in the upper deck.

“My exact words on the way over here were, `I hope this goes off without a hitch,’ because the city just looked so good, they were doing so well, the weather so good everything was kind of falling into place,” she said.

New Orleans was once a regular in the Super Bowl rotation and hopes to regain that status. Earlier in the week, the host committee announced it will bid on the 2018 Super Bowl, which would coincide with the 300th anniversary of the city’s founding.

The 38-year-old Superdome has undergone $336 million in renovations since Katrina ripped its roof in 2005. Billions have been spent sprucing up downtown, the airport, French Quarter and other areas of the city in the past seven years.

“Everything shut down,” said Carl Trinchero, a 49ers fan from Napa, Calif., who was in the Superdome. “No credit cards, vending machines shut down, everything shut down.”

Trinchero said it may have affected the momentum of the game but, given that the Ravens survived the 49ers comeback, “it didn’t affect the outcome.”

Joked Doug Cook, a Ravens fan from New Orleans: “They didn’t pay the light bill.”

Still, he admitted to a fleeting fear when the lights went out.

“I started thinking it was a terrorist attack. I was a little nervous,” he said.

In the French Quarter, fans didn’t appear much concerned with the power outage or delay in play.

“If we can blame Beyonce for lip syncing, we can blame her for the power outage,” said Gary Cimperman of Slidell, La., with a laugh as he watched the second half of the game from a bar. “Or maybe Sean Payton called in the outage, bountygate part two.”

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