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Sunday’s Super Bowl was New Orleans’ 10th as host, and officials plan to make a bid for an 11th in 2018.

Mayor Mitch Landrieu told WWL-AM on Monday that the outage won’t hurt the city’s chances, and he joked that the game got better after the blackout: “People were leaving and the game was getting boring, so we had to do a little something to spice it up.”

Jarvis DeBerry, a columnist for nola.com and The Times-Picayune, wrote that the power outage gave the media “an opportunity to laugh at the apparent ineptitude or suggest that the ghosts of Hurricane Katrina were haunting the Superdome.”

“That’s not the kind of attention the city was looking for, obviously,” he wrote, “but it’s certainly too soon to say if people will remember the power shortage over San Francisco’s furious comeback attempt against Baltimore or if this will harm the city’s future opportunities to host the Super Bowl.”

Bjorn Hanson, dean of New York University’s Center for Hospitality and Sports Management, said the episode shouldn’t hurt the city’s reputation as a big convention destination. “I think people view it for what it was: an unusual event with a near-record power draw,” he said. “It was the equivalent of a circuit breaker flipping.”

The American Association of Neurological Surgeons will meet in New Orleans from April 27 to May 1. Patty Anderson, director of meetings for the group, said of the blackout: “I never even gave it a second thought. To me, the city is bigger, stronger and more vibrant than it’s ever been.”