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“This has been, at least for our generation, the best place to be economically,” he said of Texas and its record of strong job creation.

He said he didn’t think there was more intolerance toward Hispanics in Texas.

“Obviously, I think that issue exists wherever you go,” he said. “I don’t think it’s just unique here.”

Bush said of trying to stand out among his famous political family, “It’s always been the thing of my grandmother to say, ‘Go out and make a name for yourself’ and that’s something that I’ve followed.”

“But who better to ask for advice on politics than two former presidents and a former governor?” he said. “They’re not involved in the day-to-day operations. They’re not involved in formulating my ideology. It’s more of an informal advice.”

Bush said his grandfather inspired him to join the military, and he was deployed to Afghanistan as an intelligence officer in the U.S. Naval Reserve. He said that before enlisting, he knew politics was in his blood but felt he was too inexperienced to run for office.

It wasn’t until the last few months, however, that “I felt it was time for my generation to step forward in state politics,” Bush said.

Bush now spends his time crisscrossing Texas and the country, raising money and meeting with supporters. He was in Austin on Monday and posed for pictures outside the state Capitol before disappearing into meetings with legislators.

Someone he didn’t see, however, was Perry. The governor said Bush’s seeking elected office is a good thing for Texas and the Republican Party, and that he would like to speak to him about it adding: “He knows my phone number.”

But then, Bush has his uncle to turn to for Texas gubernatorial perspective.

“It’s much like starting a business,” Bush said, “and having people who have been there and done it and run statewide, it’s definitely been helpful.”