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“And it’s not only us,” he added. “He’s ruined a lot of people’s lives.”

Armstrong was believed to have left for Hawaii. The street outside his Spanish-style villa on Austin’s west side was quiet the day after international TV crews gathered there hoping to catch a glimpse of him. Meanwhile, members of his legal team mapped out a strategy on how to handle at least two pending lawsuits against Armstrong, and possibly a third.

Former teammate Floyd Landis, who was stripped of the 2006 Tour de France title for doping, alleges in one of the lawsuits that Armstrong defrauded the U.S. government by repeatedly denying he used performance-enhancing drugs. The False Claims Act lawsuit could require Armstrong to return substantial sponsorship fees and pay a hefty fine. The AP reported earlier Tuesday that Justice Department officials were likely to join the whistleblower lawsuit before a Thursday deadline.

• Jim Litke reported from Chicago; Jim Vertuno from Austin. Stephen Wilson in London and John L. Mone in Dearborn, Mich., contributed to this article.