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Orioles programs sold at the old Memorial Stadium frequently featured photos of Weaver squabbling.

He was ejected 91 times, including once in both games of a doubleheader.

Asked once if his reputation might have harmed his chances to gain entry into the Hall of Fame, Weaver admitted, “It probably hurt me.”

Not for long. He entered the hall in 1996.

“When you discuss our game’s motivational masters, Earl is a part of that conversation,” Baseball Hall of Fame President Jeff Idelson said. “He was a proven leader in the dugout and loved being a Hall of Famer. Though small in stature, he was a giant as a manager.”

His ejections were overshadowed by his five 100-win seasons, six AL East titles and four pennants. Weaver was inducted 10 years after he managed his final game with Baltimore at the end of an ill-advised comeback.

In 1985, the Orioles’ owner at the time, Edward B. Williams, coaxed Weaver away from golf to take over a struggling squad. Weaver donned his uniform No. 4, which had already been retired by the team, and tried to breathe some life into the listless Orioles.

Baltimore went 53-52 over the last half of the 1985 season, but finished seventh in 1986 with a 73-89 record. It was Weaver’s only losing season as a major-league manager, and he retired for good after that.

“If I hadn’t come back,” Weaver said after his final game, “I would be home thinking what it would have been like to manage again. I found out it’s work.”

Former umpire Don Denkinger said he called one of Weaver’s last games in the majors.

“He comes to home plate before the game and says, ‘Gentlemen, I’m done.’ He told us the only way he’d ever come back is if he ran out of money,” Denkinger told The Associated Press by phone from Arizona. “I told him that if he ever ran out of money to call the umpires’ association and we’d take up a collection for him. We’d do anything, just to keep him off the field and away from us.”

Asked once if his reputation might have harmed his chances to gain entry into the Hall of Fame, Weaver admitted, “It probably hurt me.”

Weaver finished with a 1,480-1,060 record. He won Manager of the Year three times.

“I had a successful career, not necessarily a Hall of Fame career, but a successful one,” he said.

Weaver came to the Orioles as a first base coach in 1968, took over as manager on July 11 and went on to become the winningest manager in the history of the franchise.

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