Eyewitnesses to Benghazi attack to testify before House panel

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Witnesses to the attack on the U.S. diplomatic post in Benghazi, Libya, will testify next week at a House Oversight and Government Reform Committee hearing, Rep. Trey Gowdy, South Carolina Republican, said.

While Mr. Gowdy did not provide the names of the hearing witnesses, he told Fox News’ Greta Van Susteren that they will include people who saw the seven-hour attack on the diplomatic post.


SEE ALSO: Republicans cite attacks in Benghazi, Boston as Obama security failures


“I am not at liberty to disclose the identity of the witnesses, but I will just say … it is going to be a very informational and instructive hearing,” he said Tuesday night. “I would encourage you to follow it. Benghazi is warming up. It is not going away despite the efforts of this administration.”

“You know that hearsay evidence is not so interesting. Firsthand accounts by eyewitnesses are much more compelling,” he continued.

Rep. Darrell E. Issa, the California Republican who chairs the House committee, on Wednesday announced the hearing, “Benghazi: Exposing Failure and Recognizing Courage,” promising it will “expose new facts and details that the Obama administration has tried to suppress.”

The hearing announcement comes one day after President Obama said he was unaware of complaints from potential Benghazi whistle-blowers who contend they have been threatened over their cooperation with investigators looking into the Sept. 11, 2012, attack. Mr. Obama pledged to look into the matter, and the State Department later denied there had been any official pressure on witnesses inside the administration.

Earlier Tuesday, power lawyer Victoria Toensing, a former Justice Department official and counsel to the Intelligence Committee, said at least four career officials at the State Department and the CIA are complaining that unnamed administration officials have tried to intimidate them into not cooperating with congressional investigators. The officials, whom Ms. Toensing described as whistle-blowers, have hired lawyers or are in the process of doing so.

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