You are currently viewing the printable version of this article, to return to the normal page, please click here.

Obama orders government to prepare for impact of global warming

**FILE** President Obama speaks at a campaign event Cleveland State University during a rainstorm on Oct. 5, 2012. (Associated Press)**FILE** President Obama speaks at a campaign event Cleveland State University during a rainstorm on Oct. 5, 2012. (Associated Press)
Question of the Day

Should Congress make English the official language of the U.S.?

View results

President Obama issued an executive order Friday directing a government-wide effort to boost preparation in states and local communities for the impact of global warming.

The action orders federal agencies to work with states to build "resilience" against major storms and other weather extremes. For example, the president's order directs that infrastructure projects like bridges and flood control take into consideration climate conditions of the future, which might require building structures larger or stronger — and likely at a higher price tag.

"The impacts of climate change — including an increase in prolonged periods of excessively high temperatures, more heavy downpours, an increase in wildfires, more severe droughts, permafrost thawing, ocean acidification and sea-level rise — are already affecting communities, natural resources, ecosystems, economies and public health across the nation," the presidential order said. "The federal government must build on recent progress and pursue new strategies to improve the nation's preparedness and resilience."

There's no estimate of how much the additional planning will cost. Natural disasters including Superstorm Sandy cost the U.S. economy more than $100 billion in 2012, according to the administration.

The White House is also setting up a task force of state and local leaders to offer advice to the federal government, with several Democratic governors having agreed to serve and at least one Republican governor, from the U.S. territory of Guam.

Mr. Obama has a goal of reducing U.S. greenhouse gas emissions by 17 percent by 2020, and the Environmental Protection Agency is working on rules that would impose tougher regulations on coal-burning power plants. But much of the president's climate-change agenda has stalled in Congress, and the administration says the new order recognizes that global greenhouse gas emissions are still rising, making further damage from global warming inevitable.

At a speech at Georgetown University in June, Mr. Obama outlined executive actions he would take to require government and private industry to prepare for the effects of climate change.

"The question is not whether we need to act," Mr. Obama said at the time. "The question is whether we will have the courage to act before it's too late."

© Copyright 2014 The Washington Times, LLC. Click here for reprint permission.

Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus
TWT Video Picks