- The Washington Times - Friday, January 3, 2014

Eleven state attorneys general have signed onto a letter to Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius arguing that the administration is violating the law by making repeated changes to President Obama’s health care overhaul without congressional approval.

They specifically refer to the White House’s move to allow insurance companies to continue selling health care plans that would be out of compliance with the new mandates under Obamacare.

“We support allowing citizens to keep their health insurance coverage, but any changes to the law must be done legally and through the proper channels,” the attorneys general wrote. “The Administration may not decide single-handedly which parts of the law it will enforce and which parts it will ignore. The only way to fix this problem-ridden law is through congressional action.”

The initiative was spearheaded by West Virginia Attorney General Patrick Morrissey, and the letter was also signed by his counterparts in Alabama, Georgia, Idaho, Kansas, Louisiana, Michigan, Nebraska, Oklahoma, Texas, and Virginia.

“We are deeply concerned that this Administration is consistently rewriting new rules and effectively inventing statutory provisions to operationalize a flawed law,” they wrote.

The Obama administration has said it has the legal authority and discretion to issue a one-year reprieve, since it serves as a “bridge” while a major law is implemented.

The attorneys general also said they’re troubled by security concerns related to consumers’ private information as they sign up for health insurance through federal and state-run exchanges.

House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, Virginia Republican, is reportedly planning to schedule a vote next week on a measure to place more security requirements on the exchanges.

“If a breach occurs, it shouldn’t be up to some bureaucrat to decide when or even whether to inform an individual that their personal information has been accessed,” Mr. Cantor wrote in a memo to House Republicans obtained by Politico.

The Capitol Hill paper reported the administration saying that no security breaches have occurred to date and there is ongoing security testing to protect private information.