Topic - Brian Mcnamee

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  • Roger Clemens arrives at federal court in New York, Tuesday, April 29, 2014. Clemens is fighting a federal judge's order to share documents with his accuser in a defamation case. A judge had ruled early this month that Clemens needed to turn over hundreds of pages of documents to former New York Yankees strength coach Brian McNamee. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

    Roger Clemens in NY court for settlement talks

    Former baseball pitcher Roger Clemens and his onetime strength coach came face-to-face on Tuesday in a bid to settle their long-running legal dispute, but they emerged from a closed-door meeting without a deal.

  • Lawyer: Clemens 'not naive' over reax to verdict

    Roger Clemens' victory in court should win over some of the fans who were previously convinced that the seven-time Cy Young Award winner used performance-enhancing drugs, according to his lawyer.

  • Former professional baseball pitcher Roger Clemens, accompanied by his attorney Rusty Hardin (left), arrives June 11, 2012, at federal court in Washington for his perjury trial. (Associated Press)

    Jurors to hear closing arguments in Clemens case

    After eight weeks, jurors are finally getting to hear closing arguments in the Roger Clemens perjury trial Tuesday, and they are expected to begin deliberations later in the day.

  • FILE - In this July 6, 2011 file photo, former Major League Baseball pitcher Roger Clemens, left, with his wife Debbie Clemens arrive at federal court in Washington. Debbie Clemens testified Friday that her husband was not present when she received a shot of human growth hormone from Roger Clemens' strength coach - testimony that contradicts the star pitcher's chief accuser in the perjury trial. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)

    Wife says she took HGH — but Clemens wasn't there

    While it's an open question whether jurors think Roger Clemens used performance-enhancing substances, they now know one thing for certain: His wife sure did.

  • Former Major League Baseball pitcher Roger Clemens arrives at federal court in Washington, Thursday, May 24, 2012. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

    DNA on beer can needle 'likely' belongs to Clemens

    A needle stored with a beer can appeared to contain an extremely tiny amount of Roger Clemens' DNA, which turned out to be good news and bad news for both sides in the perjury trial of the seven-time Cy Young Award winner.

  • After signing autographs, former Major League Baseball pitcher Roger Clemens leaves federal court, Thursday, May 17, 2012, in Washington. (AP Photo/Haraz N. Ghanbari)

    McNamee: 'I misspoke' about evidence in Clemens trial

    Roger Clemens' lawyer jabbed his left index finger and hammered away, relentlessly attacking Brian McNamee over his personal life and accusing the government's chief witness of "making up this stuff on the fly." The attorney finally sprung his trap and pointed out what appeared to be a flaw in the McNamee's story about the collection of evidence that turned up in a beer can.

  • Brian McNamee, former strength coach of retired baseball great Roger Clemens, leaves federal court in Washington on May 15, 2012, after testifying at Clemens' perjury trial. (Associated Press)

    McNamee turned on Clemens over son's illness

    Brian McNamee testified that Roger Clemens' lawyers pushed him from reluctant turncoat to angry accuser when they allowed details of McNamee's oldest son's illness to be revealed during a nationally televised news conference.

  • Former Major League Baseball pitcher Roger Clemens arrives May 15, 2012, at federal court in Washington for his perjury trial. (Associated Press)

    McNamee saved Clemens' steroids waste for protection

    Brian McNamee testified Tuesday he saved medical waste after injecting Roger Clemens with steroids because his wife complained that McNamee was going to be the fall guy.

  • Former Major League Baseball pitcher Roger Clemens, who is on trial for perjury, arrives May 14, 2012, at federal court in Washington. (Associated Press)

    Chief accuser takes stand in Clemens trial

    Roger Clemens' chief accuser finally took the stand Monday in the former pitcher's perjury trial, a make-or-break moment for the government.

  • ** FILE ** Former Major League Baseball pitcher Roger Clemens leaves federal court in Washington on Tuesday, April 24, 2012. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

    Clemens' lawyer attacks 2008 congressional hearing

    A federal court jury saw snippets of Roger Clemens denying steroid use at a now-famous 2008 congressional hearing, then listened Monday as Clemens' lawyer tried in fits and starts to declare that proceeding to be "nothing more than a show trial" that shouldn't have taken place.

  • Former Major League Baseball pitcher Roger Clemens (left) and his attorney Rusty Hardin arrive at federal court in Washington on Monday, April 16, 2012, for jury selection in Clemens' perjury trial. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

    Clemens retrial begins with quest for neutral jury

    Prosecutors on Monday said they might call former baseball players Barry Bonds and Jose Canseco, current baseball Commissioner Bud Selig and New York Yankees general manager Brian Cashman as witnesses in the Roger Clemens perjury case. The defense said it might call former Clemens teammates Paul O'Neill, Jorge Posada and Mike Stanton and baseball writer Peter Gammons.

  • Former Major League Baseball pitcher Roger Clemens (center) leaves federal court in Washington on July 14, 2011, after the judge declared a mistrial in his perjury trial. (Associated Press)

    Prosecutors say Clemens should face second trial

    Prosecutors in the Roger Clemens perjury case said Friday they had made an honest mistake in showing jurors inadmissible evidence and that shouldn't save the baseball star from facing a new trial.

  • Former Major League Baseball pitcher Roger Clemens (right) and his attorney Rusty Hardin arrive at federal court in Washington on July 13, 2011, for his perjury trial. (Associated Press)

    Needles have Clemens DNA, steroids; fakery claimed

    Prosecutors said Wednesday that needles and cotton balls Roger Clemens' former trainer says he used to inject the star pitcher tested positive for Clemens' DNA and anabolic steroids — evidence the defense said was faked.

  • Clemens

    Prosecution says Clemens' DNA, steroids on needles

    Prosecutors said Wednesday that needles and cotton balls Roger Clemens' former trainer says he used to inject the star pitcher tested positive for Clemens' DNA and anabolic steroids — evidence the defense said was faked.

  • Former Major League Baseball pitcher Roger Clemens leaves federal court in Washington, Thursday, July 7, 2011, during jury selection in his trial on charges of lying to Congress in 2008 when he denied ever using performance-enhancing drugs. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

    SNYDER: Clemens' errors rooted in his Texas-sized ego

    In deciding to voluntarily testify before Congress in 2008, Roger Clemens displayed little intelligence and insulted our own. Now everyone has to pay as baseball, yet again, is dragged through its Steroid Era.

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Quotations
  • Clemens spent 4 1/2 years proclaiming his innocence after Brian McNamee, his former personal trainer, told baseball investigator George Mitchell that he injected the pitcher with steroids and human growth hormone about 16 to 21 times during 1998, 2000 and 2001.

    Acquittal could boost Clemens' Hall bid →

  • McNamee produced a needle and other materials he said were from a steroids injection of Clemens in 2001, items that McNamee said he stored in and around a Miller Lite beer can inside a FedEx box for some six years.

    Roger Clemens acquitted on all charges →

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