Topic - Larry Klayman

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  • Court rejects early appeal of surveillance ruling

    The Supreme Court on Monday declined an early look at a constitutional challenge to the National Security Agency's bulk collection of millions of Americans' telephone records, instead allowing the dispute to work its way through the usual lower-court process.

  • Families of three fallen Navy SEALs are suing Afghan President Hamid Karzai, his security forces and Iran. The lawsuit accuses Mr. Karzai of accepting bribes for the deaths of U.S. servicemen and of leaking details of a SEAL mission to the Taliban. (Associated Press)

    Families sue Karzai, Iran for '11 chopper shootdown

    Three U.S. families filed a lawsuit Tuesday against Afghan President Hamid Karzai and his security forces, accusing them of betraying their sons in the Aug. 6, 2011, helicopter shootdown that killed 30 Americans, 17 of them Navy SEALs.

  • A CH-47 Chinook helicopter, like this one used for training, was shot down by the Taliban in Afghanistan, killing all aboard. A special-operations officer questions the use of the craft for such "hot-LZ" purposes. (U.S. Navy photograph via Associated Press)

    Families sue Karzai, Afghan security forces for downing of U.S. helicopter in 2011

    Three U.S. families filed a lawsuit Tuesday against Afghan President Hamid Karzai and his security forces, accusing them of betraying their sons in a 2011 helicopter shoot-down that killed 30 Americans.

  • "Mitt," a Netflix documentary featuring behind-the-scenes details and personal moments from Mitt Romney's presidential campaign, debuts next month. (NETFLIX)

    Inside the Beltway: Larry Klayman's spiritual calling

    There is a noteworthy dimension to Larry Klayman's zeal to be a vigilant government watchdog. The Creator is a presence for the conservative attorney who is ever ready to file a lawsuit to underscore the presence of corruption or ethical lapses within federal agencies.

  • Klayman

    Legal gadfly can sting NSA, even his own mother

    There's still a fire in his belly and multiple causes in his heart. Lawyer and longtime conservative legal gadfly Larry Klayman, the man behind the first successful lawsuit against the National Security Agency's mass surveillance programs, remains ready to rumble on behalf of ethics and morality within the American legal and governmental systems.

  • Klayman

    Legal gadfly in NSA surveillance case can sting even his own mother in pursuit of principles

    There's still a fire in his belly and multiple causes in his heart. Lawyer and longtime conservative legal gadfly Larry Klayman, the man behind the first successful lawsuit against the National Security Agency's mass surveillance programs, remains ready to rumble on behalf of ethics and morality within the American legal and governmental systems.

  • Former President George W. Bush will step back into public view Tuesday when he appears with Jay Leno on NBC's "Tonight Show." "I think he may be looking to be in the role of an elder statesman now," historian Bruce Buchanan says. (Associated Press)

    Inside the Beltway: Step aside, here comes George W. Bush

    An alarm must have gone off somewhere, signaling former President George W. Bush to step out of his polite, self-imposed exile and back onto public radar. Indeed, Mr. Bush makes a noteworthy debut Tuesday evening, joining NBC "Tonight Show" host Jay Leno, the sole late night guy who wears an American flag pin.

  • Plaintiff: Larry Klayman says a district court judge is "the last bastion of protection for the American people." (Associated Press)

    NSA snooping programs taken to federal court

    A public interest lawyer who says the government is "messing" with his text messages pleaded with a federal judge Monday to halt the government's electronic snooping programs, in a case that tests whether Americans will be able to challenge the NSA's phone-records collection in regular courts.

  • Conservatives and others will rally next week near the White House to demand the president's resignation. Organizers are taking a page from the Occupy movement, which had people camping in McPherson Square from late 2011 to early 2012.
Tents still remain throughout McPherson Square less than an hour before the deadline set by the National Park Service for Occupy DC protesters to remove camping material from McPherson Square and Freedom Plaza, Washington, DC, Monday, January 30, 2012. (Andrew Harnik / The Washington Times) (andrew harnik/the washington times)

    Conservative protest borrows tactic from Occupy movement

    A group of conservative activists is borrowing from the protest playbook of the Occupy movement, encouraging demonstrators to camp out within sight of the White House in Lafayette Square next week as part of an ongoing movement demanding the resignation of President Obama and other high-level federal government officials.

  • Elizabeth Strange, center, carries her son's remains, with Breanna Hostetler, fiance of the deceased, right, as they depart after a a flag presentation ceremony for U.S. Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Michael Joseph Strange, a cryptology technician, in Logan Circle Thursday, Aug. 18, 2011, in Philadelphia. Strange was assigned to the Navy SEAL team whose Chinook helicopter was shot down Aug. 6 by a rocket-propelled grenade in what has become the deadliest single loss for U.S. forces in the decade-long war in Afghanistan. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

    Questions about Navy officer's cremation deepen mystery of Chinook crash in Afghanistan

    A lingering mystery in the August 2011 helicopter crash that killed 30 U.S. servicemen in Afghanistan is why some bodies were cremated and some were not.

  • Families suspect SEAL Team 6 crash was inside job on worst day in Afghanistan

    Questions haunt the families of Extortion 17, the 2011 helicopter mission in Afghanistan that suffered the most U.S. military deaths in a single day in the war on terrorism.

  • Iranian workers continue operations at the Bushehr nuclear power plant, although the Natanz enrichment nuclear plant was not fed uranium on Nov. 16. Iran's nuclear chief said Tuesday that a malicious computer worm known as Stuxnet has not harmed the country's atomic program and accused the West of trying to sabotage it. Iran earlier confirmed that Stuxnet infected several personal laptops belonging to employees at Bushehr but that plant systems were not affected. (International Iran Photo Agency via Associated Press)

    In classified cyberwar against Iran, trail of Stuxnet leak leads to White House

    The Obama administration provided a New York Times reporter exclusive access to a range of high-level national security officials for a book that divulged highly classified information on a U.S. cyberwar on Iran's nuclear program, internal State Department emails show.

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