Topic - Nepal

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  • This Friday, May 23, 2014 photo shows a mirliton vine in a backyard in River Ridge, La. A Tulane University historian is working to restore the edible gourd called chayote, vegetable pear or mirliton to backyards across the Gulf Coast.  (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

    A crusade to save backyard edible gourd

    Prison inmates, a researcher in Nepal and a Cajun chef are among those contributing to a historian's understanding of chayote and his project to restore the edible gourd to backyards across the Gulf Coast.

  • Jackson cameraman details deadly day on Everest

    When John Griber heard the roaring sound of an avalanche at around 6:30 a.m. April 18 he wasn't too concerned.

  • This April 24, 2014 photo released by Adrian Ballinger, founder and head guide of Alpenglow Expeditions, shows a meeting between Nepalese government delegation and Sherpa mountain guides near Everest base camp, Nepal. Nepal's attempts to salvage the Mount Everest climbing season took another hit Friday as more Sherpa mountain guides packed and left the base camp for their village homes a week after the deadliest disaster on the world's highest mountain. (AP Photo/Alpenglow Expeditions, Adrian Ballinger)

    Sherpas struggle with climbing season in disarray

    With Mount Everest's climbing season in disarray, the Sherpa guides who decided to abandon the mountain this year after a deadly avalanche said Friday that they would struggle to make ends meet.

  • Nimdige Sherpa holds a portrait of her son Ang Kaji Sherpa, killed in an avalanche on Mount Everest, with her husband Ankchu Sherpa seated beside her in their rented apartment in Katmandu, Nepal, Wednesday, April 23, 2014. Dozens of Sherpa guides packed up their tents and left Mount Everest's base camp Wednesday, after the avalanche deaths of 16 of their colleagues exposed an undercurrent of resentment by Sherpas over their pay, treatment and benefits. (AP Photo/Niranjan Shrestha)

    Everest climbing season in disarray after deaths

    Nepal's attempts to salvage the Mount Everest climbing season took another hit Friday as more Sherpa mountain guides packed and left the base camp for their village homes a week after the deadliest disaster on the world's highest mountain.

  • Bhutanese immigrants form cricket team in Erie

    The crack of a bat broke the silence one afternoon last week at Roman Blaszczyk Field, a softball diamond on Erie's east side.

  • Relatives of mountaineers, killed in an avalanche on Mount Everest, cry during the funeral ceremony in Katmandu, Nepal, Monday, April 21, 2014. Buddhist monks cremated the remains of Sherpa guides who were buried in the deadliest avalanche ever recorded on Mount Everest, a disaster that has prompted calls for a climbing boycott by Nepal's ethnic Sherpa community. The avalanche killed at least 13 Sherpas. Three other Sherpas remain missing and are presumed dead. (AP Photo/Niranjan Shrestha)

    Sherpas leave Everest; some expeditions nix climbs

    Dozens of Sherpa guides packed up their tents and left Mount Everest's base camp Wednesday, after the deaths of 16 of their colleagues in an avalanche exposed an undercurrent of resentment by Sherpas over their pay, treatment and benefits.

  • A Buddhist monk lights the funeral pyre of Nepalese climber Ang Kaji Sherpa  killed in an avalanche on Mount Everest,  in Katmandu, Nepal, Monday, April 21, 2014. Buddhist monks cremated the remains of Sherpa guides who were buried in the deadliest avalanche ever recorded on Mount Everest, a disaster that has prompted calls for a climbing boycott by Nepal's ethnic Sherpa community. The avalanche killed at least 13 Sherpas. Three other Sherpas remain missing and are presumed dead. (AP Photo/Niranjan Shrestha)

    Sherpas consider boycott after Everest avalanche

    Buddhist monks cremated the remains of Sherpa guides who were buried in the deadliest avalanche to hit Mount Everest, a disaster that has prompted calls for a climbing boycott by Nepal's ethnic Sherpa community.

  • FILE - In this Saturday May 17, 2003 file photo, a view of the Kumbhu icefall, the first hurdle in the ascent to Everest from base camp, is seen from Everest Base camp, where 12 Nepalese guides were killed, Nepal. An avalanche swept down a climbing route on Mount Everest early Friday, killing at least 12 Nepalese guides and leaving three missing in the deadliest disaster on the world's highest peak. (AP Photo/Gurinder Osan, file)

    13th body pulled from snow in Everest avalanche

    Nepal's authorities temporarily halted climbing on Mount Everest while search teams dug through snow and ice Sunday for three Sherpa guides missing in the deadliest avalanche on the world's highest peak that killed 13 others.

  • A Buddhist monk performs rituals next to a casket containing the dead body of Nepalese mountaineer Ang Kaji Sherpa, killed in an avalanche on Mount Everest, offer prayers at the Sherpa Monastery in Katmandu, Nepal, Sunday, April 20, 2014. Rescuers were searching through piles of snow and ice on the slopes of Mount Everest on Saturday for four Sherpa guides who were buried by an avalanche that killed 12 other Nepalese guides in the deadliest disaster on the world's highest peak. The Sherpa people are one of the main ethnic groups in Nepal's alpine region, and many make their living as climbing guides on Everest and other Himalayan peaks. (AP Photo/Niranjan Shrestha)

    Survivors recall chaos, fear in Everest avalanche

    Survivors of Mount Everest's deadliest avalanche recalled scenes of panic and chaos, describing Sunday how they dug through snow with their hands and ice axes in hopes of finding their friends alive.

  • Mother of Nepalese mountaineer Ang Kaji Sherpa, killed in an avalanche on Mount Everest, holds prayers beads in her hand and cries while she waits for his body at Sherpa Monastery in Katmandu, Nepal, Saturday, April 19, 2014. Search teams recovered a 13th body Saturday from the snow and ice covering a dangerous climbing pass on Mount Everest, where an avalanche a day earlier swept over a group of Sherpa guides in the deadliest disaster on the world's highest peak. The Sherpa people are one of the main ethnic groups in Nepal's alpine region, and many make their living as climbing guides on Everest and other Himalayan peaks. (AP Photo/Niranjan Shrestha)

    Everest avalanche a reminder of risks Sherpas face

    The rescuers moved quickly, minutes after the first block of ice tore loose from Mount Everest and started an avalanche that roared down the mountain, ripping through teams of guides hauling gear.

  • A Nepalese Sherpa Dawa Tashi, who was injured during an avalanche, gets treatment at a hospital in Katmandu, Nepal, Friday, April 18, 2014. An avalanche swept down a climbing route on Mount Everest early Friday, killing at least 12 Nepalese guides and leaving three missing in the deadliest disaster on the world's highest peak. (AP Photo/Niranjan Shrestha)

    Avalanche sweeps down Everest, killing at least 12

    Rescuers were searching through piles of snow and ice on the slopes of Mount Everest on Saturday for four Sherpa guides who were buried by an avalanche that killed 12 other Nepalese guides in the deadliest disaster on the world's highest peak.

  • Nepal says litterbugs no longer welcome on Everest

    Litterbugs, beware: Nepal is making new rules to persuade trekkers to clean up after themselves on Mount Everest, in the hopes of clearing the tons of rubbish now clogging the world's highest peak.

  • Founder of Seattle nonprofit charged with rape

    Prosecutors say the co-founder of a Seattle-based nonprofit that aims to prevent sexual exploitation of women has fled the country after being charged with child rape.

  • Nepal doctors end strike after promise of reform

    Thousands of doctors in Nepal ended a five-day strike on Friday after the government assured them there would be changes in the country's medical education system.

  • Nepal doctor strike leaves thousands without care

    A strike by doctors in Nepal left tens of thousands of patients with access only to emergency care Monday as physicians demanded sweeping changes to the country's medical education system.

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