- The Washington Times - Friday, September 9, 2005

The NFL provided a curious platform for a number of screed-issuing entertainers to celebrate the launch of a uniquely American institution last night, starting with the Bush-bashing, conspiracy-addled Kanye West.

His political commentary apparently passes as evidence of a powerful intellect to the milquetoast editors of Time magazine, only too happy to put West on the cover of their dated publication before his race-baiting appearance on an NBC telethon intended to help the victims of Hurricane Katrina.

“George Bush doesn’t care about black people,” West said, which probably was not a smart thing to say to viewers being solicited to make donations.

West could assume that a polarizing remark undermines the plea to donate, particularly if the viewer is a supporter of President Bush. The deduction should be easy enough to make if he is as intellectually deep as Time’s editors seem to think.

Perhaps West is so deep his motives are not to be understood by mundane thinkers.

West is a brilliant artist, after all, although he is culling from the same old material of the far-left entertainment industry.

If a limousine carrying a deep-thinking entertainer incurs a flat tire, you can be certain the entertainer will issue a statement that puts the blame on the Bush administration or America or Halliburton.

This nuance-stuffed indictment follows a strained path, which, of course, impresses the feeble editors of Time.

It is deemed cutting-edge stuff, odd as that is, because all the political stuff from the entertainment industry is the same old stuff, hardly edgy, just stale, not unlike a Hare Krishna chant.

At least Sean Penn added an interesting twist to his cliches from his sinking rescue boat in New Orleans, where he heroically bailed water with a plastic cup to save his personal photographer and entourage.

Artists imitate each other.

As Carlos Santana has put it, Bush must change his “evil ways.”

Santana was another enlightened performer of the NFL concert show.

“The only thing I know is all wars are wrong,” he said, which really seems simplistic, considering the world’s history.

But who knows how the editors of Time magazine would respond?

They might parse the heck out of the comment and decide that Santana is a genius as well.

Santana has thought long and hard about many daunting issues.

“This whole planet, everyone, should have free electricity, water and education,” he said.

We believe the whole planet should have a free copy of “The Essential Santana,” listed at $22.99 on amazon.com.

The Rolling Stones put in a taped appearance from Detroit, if only to hype their neo-con diatribe and let fans know that Keith Richards is actually still alive, incredible as it may be from the unsettling looks of him.

The punk rockers of Green Day complemented the NFL’s theme, as the newly honored because of their anti-war opera “American Idiot.”

They no doubt labored in earnest to come up with the word idiot, for the title easily could have been “American Moron.”

We will leave it to the editors of Time to explore the rich texture of American and idiot.

No revelry intended to champion the game of football, gyrating cheerleaders and beer-swilling fans would be complete without the “Rock Against Bush” services of Good Charlotte.

The Waldorf, Md., group is accustomed to tapping into the anxiety of its target audience of teens, which is a far different business from appealing to those who find joy in a game.

The NFL took no chances with this combustible mix. It requested that ABC air the show with a 10-second tape delay.

The precaution was imposed not just because of the threat of political statements and four-letter words.

You just never know when Janet Jackson’s breast is going to pop into view.


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