Skip to content
Advertisement

Security

Ukrainian servicemen sit in a bus after leaving Mariupol's besieged Azovstal steel plant, near a penal colony, in Olyonivka, in territory under the government of the Donetsk People's Republic, eastern Ukraine, Friday, May 20, 2022. (AP Photo)

Who were Mariupol’s last defenders?

Associated Press

The Ukrainian forces who made a determined last stand in a Mariupol steel mill against Russian troops were a mixture of seasoned soldiers, border guards, a controversial national guard regiment and volunteers who took up arms in the weeks before Russia’s invasion.

U.S. President Joe Biden, right, speaks during a news conference with South Korean President Yoon Suk Yeol, left, at the People's House, Saturday, May 21, 2022, in Seoul. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

U.S. and South Korea open to expanded joint military drills to deter North

- Associated Press

U.S. President Joe Biden and South Korean President Yoon Suk Yeol said after meeting Saturday that they will consider expanded joint military exercises to deter the nuclear threat from North Korea at a time when there’s little hope of real diplomacy on the matter.

Ukrainian servicemen sit in a bus after they left the besieged Mariupol's Azovstal steel plant, near a penal colony in Olyonivka, in territory under the government of the Donetsk People's Republic, eastern Ukraine, Friday, May 20, 2022. (AP Photo)

In biggest victory yet, Russia claims to capture Mariupol

- Associated Press

In what would be its biggest victory yet in the war with Ukraine, Russia claimed to have captured Mariupol after a nearly three-month siege that reduced much of the strategic port city to a smoking ruin, with over 20,000 civilians feared dead.

Related Articles

The United Nation flag waves in the wind on the top of an UN building in Geneva, Switzerland Monday, June 14, 2021. A veteran Russian diplomat to the U.N. Office at Geneva says he handed in his resignation before sending out a scathing letter to foreign colleagues inveighing against the “aggressive war unleashed” by President Vladimir Putin in Ukraine. Boris Bondarev, 41, confirmed his resignation in a letter delivered Monday morning at the Russian diplomatic mission after a diplomatic official passed on his English-language statement to The Associated Press. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber, File )

'Never have I been so ashamed': Russian envoy criticizes war

- Associated Press

A veteran Russian diplomat to the U.N. Office at Geneva says he handed in his resignation before sending out a scathing letter to foreign colleagues inveighing against the "aggressive war unleashed" by Russian President Vladimir Putin in Ukraine.

Russian Sgt. Vadim Shishimarin attends a court hearing in Kyiv, Ukraine, Monday, May 23, 2022. The court sentenced the 21-year-old soldier to life in prison on Monday for killing a Ukrainian civilian, in the first war crimes trial held since Russia's invasion. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

Live updates | Russia accused of spreading disinformation

- Associated Press

UNITED NATIONS - The United States and Britain are accusing Russia of spreading disinformation online and manipulating public opinion about the war in Ukraine and vehemently rejecting Russian claims that the West is aiming to control all information flows and define what is true or not true.

President Joe Biden speaks during a news conference with Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida at Akasaka Palace, Monday, May 23, 2022, in Tokyo. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Biden: U.S. would intervene with military to defend Taiwan

- Associated Press

President Biden said Monday that the U.S. would intervene militarily if China were to invade Taiwan, saying the burden to protect Taiwan is "even stronger' after Russia's invasion of Ukraine. It was one of the most forceful presidential statements in support of self-governing in decades.

Belarus regiment leader, Vadim Prokopiev, practices at a shooting range near Warsaw, Poland, Friday, May 20, 2022. Belarusians are among the foreign fighters who have volunteered to take up arms in Ukraine against Russian forces. They consider the Ukrainians defending their homeland to be their brethren. And by joining their resistance to Russia's onslaught, they hope to weaken the rule of Russian President Vladimir Putin, and ultimately that of Belarus President Alexander Lukashenko. (AP Photo/Michal Dyjuk)

Belarusians join war seeking to free Ukraine and themselves

- Associated Press

One is a restaurateur who fled Belarus when he learned he was about to be arrested for criticizing President Alexander Lukashenko. Another was given the choice of either denouncing fellow opposition activists or being jailed. And one is certain his brother was killed by the country's security forces.

In this photo taken from video released by the Russian Defense Ministry on Friday, May 20, 2022, a Russian serviceman frisks a Ukrainian serviceman after they leaved the besieged Azovstal steel plant in Mariupol, in territory under the government of the Donetsk People's Republic, eastern Ukraine. (Russian Defense Ministry Press Service via AP)

Fate of 2,500 Ukrainian POWs from steel plant stirs concern

- Associated Press

With Russia claiming to have taken prisoner nearly 2,500 Ukrainian fighters from the besieged Mariupol steel plant, concerns grew about their fate as a Moscow-backed separatist leader vowed they would face tribunals.

In this file photo from Jan. 7, 2020, Syrian President Bashar Assad, left, gestures while speaking to Russian President Vladimir Putin during their meeting in Damascus, Syria. (Alexei Druzhinin, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP, File)  **FILE**

Russia: It's time to stop aid from Turkey to Syrian rebels

- Associated Press

Russia's deputy U.N. ambassador says he sees no reason to continue humanitarian aid deliveries from Turkey to rebel-held northwest Syria, accusing the West and the United Nations of insufficient efforts to deliver aid from Damascus and failing to finance "early recovery projects" to improve life for millions of Syrians.

A snowy egret forages in a salt marsh, Wednesday, May 11, 2022, in Parris Island, S.C. Salt marsh makes up more than half of the base's 8,000 acres (3,200 hectares), and the island's highest point, by the fire station, is just 13 feet (4 meters) above sea level. (AP Photo/Stephen B. Morton)

Parris Island wages battles, not war, against climate change

- Associated Press

Rising seas are encroaching on one of America's most storied military installations, where thousands of recruits are molded into Marines each year amid the salt marshes of South Carolina's Lowcountry region.