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Chinese President Xi Jinping, center, and Vietnam Communist Party General Secretary Nguyen Phu Trong, right, wave during a welcoming ceremony at the presidential palace in Hanoi, Vietnam Sunday, Nov. 12, 2017. (Hoang Dinh Nam/Pool Photo via AP)

The double-edged sword of China

A few weeks ago, Chinese President Xi Jinping offered a Soviet-style five-year plan for China’s progress at the Communist Party Congress in Beijing. Despite his talk of global cooperation, the themes were familiar socialist boilerplate about Chinese economic and military superiority to come.

Illustration on 529 savings accounts by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Giving families a helping hand with educational expenses

Putting four children through college would be a challenge for most families. Certainly it is for Jenny Clark and her husband, Michael, but they have made saving for their children’s college educations a priority.

Illustration on King Josiah hearing the reading of the law    The Washington Times

Rediscovering the Bible lost in America

There’s an Old Testament story that bears striking resemblance to what’s going on today in America. It’s the story of King Josiah finding the lost Book of the Law.

Former President Bill Clinton speaks at a gathering in Little Rock, Ark., on Saturday, Nov. 18, 2017, marking 25 years since his election. He and his wife Hillary Clinton appeared before about 2,600 people at the event in the Statehouse Convention Center. (AP Photo/Kelly P. Kissel)

The liberal ruse of feminism

Charlie Rose, formerly of PBS and CBS. Glenn Thrush of The New York Times. The collapse of the liberal establishment Masters of the Universe continues. Yet for some reason, the Democratic and liberal establishment think now is the time to condemn … Bill Clinton.

American Negotiations with North Korea Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Encouraging signs following Trump’s visit to Seoul

I was part of a small fact-finding delegation to South Korea immediately after President Trump’s Nov. 7-8 visit. The message we received in Seoul was universal: President Trump’s visit was a success; his presentation at the National Assembly was well-received. To a person, all were appreciative of the president’s comments, juxtaposing a vibrant liberal democracy in the South and an authoritarian and capricious regime in the North.

Volunteers tie the wooden cross that was carried through the streets of Etna, Pa., a Pittsburgh suburb, to the larger cross in the cemetery where their annual "Drama of The Cross," service was done on Good Friday, Friday, April 18, 2014. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic) ** FILE **

America on fire, as love for God cools

- The Washington Times

America was built on Judeo-Christian principles, steered into existence by Founding Fathers who believed — yes, even the less religious ones — that this republic could not survive absent a moral, virtuous people. My, how wise the founders. That was then. This is now: Roy Moore. Al Franken.

Illustration on cybersecurity by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Closing the cyber skills gap

In the digitally integrated world we live in today, it’s nearly impossible to function successfully in any industry without making cybersecurity staffing a priority. No matter the size, no matter the sector, businesses all across the country are in growing need of professionals who specialize in cybersecurity.

Illustration of Bill and Hillary Clinton by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A tale of two cultures

“Prospect of New Special Counsel Rattles Justice” was the scary front-page headline on a recent, worried edition of The Washington Post. The faux fuss was caused by Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ suggestion that after weighing recommendations from senior prosecutors, he might appoint a special counsel to investigate Hillary Clinton’s role in the Uranium One deal.

Map of Armenia, Azerbaijan, Nagorno Karabakh

Losing the moral compass over Nagorno-Karabakh

When it comes to American foreign aid, it is often the message — rather than the dollar figure — that matters. A textbook case is Nagorno-Karabakh, the internationally recognized Azerbaijani territory, illegally occupied by Armenia.

Senator Al Franken   Associated Press photo

Back to the future with Franken

- The Washington Times

It’s already begun. Liberal activists and pundits are arguing that Minnesota Sen. Al Franken’s documented piggishness toward women should be discounted, forgiven or perhaps even ignored given the fact that he is, well, one of them.

Hillary and Bill Clinton. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Who knew so much testosterone rides the capital breeze?

- The Washington Times

These are not happy times for anybody. You can’t keep up with the serial sexual offenders without a scorecard, and the list grows longer every day and all the claims won’t fit on one scorecard. Seekers of cash settlements are advised to not take checks, and hurry to the bank and get in line before the cash runs out.

Related Articles

Illustration on Thanksgiving by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

'Gathering together to ask the Lord's blessing'

We gather together" are the three little words that set the theme for family and friends joining in the celebration of Thanksgiving. The words that follow — "to ask the Lord's blessing" — are not from an American hymn, but from the gratitude of an unknown author set to 16th century Dutch music. The lyrics put down roots in America as a unifier, and were particularly popular during World War II when our enemies were recognized as "wicked oppressors" and the nation was united against evil.

Illustration on being thankful for President Trump by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Can Trump-haters be thankful for him?

Any other Republican president but Donald Trump might expect to get at least some credit for the mostly positive direction in which the country is headed. Unfortunately, the Trump-haters prefer to focus on his, shall I say, unusual personality, rather than results. So let's put personality aside and consider what has happened in his first 10 months in office.

Dancing, spying and surviving

The infinite beauty of the ballet and the infinite cruelty of the methods of Soviet communism are expertly explored in this unusual and memorable thriller.

Illustration on territories liberated from ISIS by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The battle for the lands of the caliphate

Soon after taking office, President Trump ordered his national security advisers to provide "a complete strategic review of our policy toward the rogue regime in Iran." Last month, based on that review, he announced a new strategy "to confront the Iranian regime's hostile actions," including its development of missiles capable of carrying nuclear warheads, its support for terrorists, and its neo-imperialist aggressions. This month that strategy is facing its first serious test.

Al Franken Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

With Al Franken at the Thanksgiving feast

As Americans prepare for their Thanksgiving Day turkey or perhaps protein bars, or possibly artichoke hearts, or whatever the au courant are dining upon this year, I would like to propose a thought. You all have much to be grateful for. Our friends on the left may doubt it, but even they have much to be grateful for. For my part, I am grateful not to have Al Franken for a neighbor. You saw what one of the zealots did to his neighbor Sen. Rand Paul. Moreover, I have two very pretty daughters, who will be visiting me. With Mr. Franken in the neighborhood, we would have to maintain a high security watch, possibly even an electrified fence with barbed wire.

Turkeys, worms and Schadenfreude

Republicans and other conservatives who are tempted to indulge excessive Schadenfreude over the woes of Charlie Rose, Al Franken and their sordid fellows, taking delight in their pain and humiliation, should remember Iron Law of Politics No. 3, that nothing recedes like success. Giving too many hoots and hollers at turkeys over this holiday season is great fun, but the universal truth about worms is that they eventually turn.

FILE - In this May 15, 2017 file photo, protesters hold signs during a demonstration against President Donald Trump's revised travel ban, outside a federal courthouse in Seattle. A Somali refugee living in Washington state is asking a federal judge to let his wife and young children join him in the U.S., saying the Trump administration's indefinite ban on allowing the families of refugees to enter the country violates immigration law. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)

Bordering on Obama-era dysfunction

Fidelity is scarce in Donald Trump's Washington, except among the not so loyal opposition. Whether owing to compassion or incompetence, the Trump administration one year on has failed to replace holdovers, leaving in place Barack Obama's people who are dedicated to obstruction and delay of the new era. In some federal departments, the greatest danger a bureaucrat faces is a paper cut. But about immigration, it's whether the laws enacted to protect the American people will be enforced.

Look for torment in killers' pasts?

Whenever a large-scale atrocity is committed, society ought to look beyond the perpetrator's act and toward his motivation for committing the act, however abhorrent. This should be done with the goal of hopefully learning enough to prevent a future recurrence by another societal monster. Otherwise the great suffering that has been caused is essentially without positive purpose.

Left resents Trump's success

Why do the Democrats want to impeach President Trump? Is it because he wants to keep America free, strong and safe? Or could it be that his presidency has caused the stock market to boom, businesses to come back to our shores and job numbers to rise?