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Energy & Environment

The latest updates on energy and environment news, analysis and opinion covering energy policy and its impact on resources and climate.

Whale carcasses are scattered along the water's edge near Strahan, Australia, Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2020. Authorities revised up the number of pilot whales rescued from Australia's worst-ever mass stranding from 50 to 70 on Thursday, Sept. 24, 2020, as the focus shifted to removing 380 carcasses from Tasmania state shallows. (Patrick Gee/Pool Photo via AP)

88 whales rescued from Australia’s worst mass beaching

- Associated Press

Authorities have rescued 88 pilot whales and are attempting to free 20 others that survived Australia’s worst mass stranding, as crews prepare to remove 380 decomposing carcasses from the shallows of Tasmania state, officials said Thursday.

This screen shot from pool video shows California Gov. Gavin Newsom announcing Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2020 that the state will halt sales of new gasoline-powered passenger cars and trucks by 2035, in Sacramento, Calif. On Wednesday he ordered state regulators to come up with requirements to meet that goal. California would be the first state with such a rule, though Germany and France are among 15 other countries that have a similar requirement. (Pool via AP)

California moves to end sales of new gas-powered cars

- Associated Press

California will halt sales of new gasoline-powered passenger cars and trucks by 2035, Gov. Gavin Newsom announced Wednesday, a move he says will cut greenhouse gas emissions by 35% in the nation’s most populous state.

Floodwaters move on the street, Wednesday, Sept. 16, 2020, in Pensacola, Fla. Hurricane Sally made landfall Wednesday near Gulf Shores, Alabama, as a Category 2 storm, pushing a surge of ocean water onto the coast and dumping torrential rain that forecasters said would cause dangerous flooding from the Florida Panhandle to Mississippi and well inland in the days ahead.(AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

After Hurricane Sally: Rescue, recovery and a wary eye on rivers

- Associated Press

Rivers swollen by Hurricane Sally’s rains threatened more misery for parts of the Florida Panhandle and south Alabama on Thursday, even as the storm’s remnants were forecast to dump up to a foot of rain and spread the threat of flooding to Georgia and the Carolinas.

Flood waters move on the street, Wednesday, Sept. 16, 2020, in downtown Pensacola, Fla. Hurricane Sally made landfall Wednesday near Gulf Shores, Alabama, as a Category 2 storm, pushing a surge of ocean water onto the coast and dumping torrential rain that forecasters said would cause dangerous flooding from the Florida Panhandle to Mississippi and well inland in the days ahead.(AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

Hurricane Sally unleashes flooding along the Gulf Coast

- Associated Press

Hurricane Sally lumbered ashore near the Florida-Alabama line Wednesday with 105 mph (165) winds and rain measured in feet, not inches, swamping homes and trapping people in high water as it crept inland for what could be a long, slow and disastrous drenching across the Deep South.

Waves crash near a pier, at Gulf State Park, Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2020, in Gulf Shores, Ala. Hurricane Sally is crawling toward the northern Gulf Coast at just 2 mph, a pace that's enabling the storm to gather huge amounts of water to eventually dump on land. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbrt)

Resurgent Sally threatens drenching in Alabama, Florida

- Associated Press

A newly strengthened Hurricane Sally pummeled the Florida Panhandle and south Alabama with sideways rain, beach-covering storm surges, strong winds and power outages early Wednesday, moving toward shore at an agonizingly slow pace that promised a drawn out drenching and possible record floods.

Nikita Pero of Gulfport, Miss., walks with her son Vinny Pero, 2, on the beach along the Gulf of Mexico in Biloxi, Miss., Monday, Sept. 14, 2020. Hurricane Sally is expected to make landfall along the Gulf Coast sometime through the night and morning. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

Hurricane Sally slows, gathering a deluge for the Gulf Coast

- Associated Press

Hurricane Sally, a plodding storm with winds of 85 mph (137 kph), crept toward the northern Gulf Coast early Tuesday as forecasters warned of potentially deadly storm surges and flash floods with up to 2 feet (.61 meters) of rain and the possibility of tornadoes.

Democratic presidential candidate and former Vice President Joe Biden speaks about climate change and wildfires affecting western states, Monday, Sept. 14, 2020, in Wilmington, Del. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Biden dings Trump as ‘climate arsonist’

- The Washington Times

Joseph R. Biden on Monday slammed President Trump’s views on climate change, calling the Republican a “climate arsonist” and warning the wildfires raging in the West are a bigger threat to the nation’s suburbs than immigration.

Kim Miller and Monty Graham open their truck bed and began loading up sandbags along U.S. 90  in preparation for Tropical Storm Sally, Sunday, Sept. 13, 2020 in Gulfport, Miss. (Alyssa Newton/The Sun Herald via AP)

Slow-moving Hurricane Sally carrying a deluge to Gulf Coast

- Associated Press

Storm-weary Gulf Coast residents rushed to finish last-minute preparations Monday as Hurricane Sally chugged slowly through warm Gulf waters. Forecasters said the biggest threat is flooding, with as much as two feet of rain falling in some areas.

Evacuees from the Riverside Fire stay in tents at the Milwaukie-Portland Elks Lodge, Sunday, Sept. 13, 2020, in Oak Grove, Ore. (AP Photo/John Locher)

Fires raise fight over climate change before Trump’s visit

- Associated Press

With crews battling wildfires that have killed at least 35 people, destroyed neighborhoods and enveloped the West Coast in smoke, another fight has emerged: leaders in the Democratic-led states and President Donald Trump have clashed over the role of climate change ahead of his visit Monday to California.

A firefighter puts out a hot spot along Highway 38 northwest of Forrest Falls, Calif., as the El Dorado Fire continues to burn Thursday afternoon, Sept. 10, 2020. The fire started by a device at a gender reveal party on Saturday. (Will Lester/The Orange County Register/SCNG via AP)

10 dead as California fire becomes deadliest of year

- Associated Press

A Northern California wildfire that destroyed a foothill hamlet has become the state’s deadliest blaze of the year with 10 people confirmed dead - and the toll could climb as searchers look for 16 missing people.

In this photo provided by Frederic Larson, the Golden Gate Bridge is seen at 11 a.m. PT, Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2020, in San Francisco, amid a smoky, orange hue caused by the ongoing wildfires. (Frederic Larson via AP)

California fire that killed 3 threatens thousands of homes

- Associated Press

A Northern California wildfire threatened thousands of homes Thursday after winds whipped it into a monster that incinerated houses in a small mountain community and killed at least three people.

Embers fly from a tree stump as the Creek Fire burns in the Cascadel Woods neighborhood of Madera County, Calif., on Monday, Sept. 7, 2020. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)

California sets record with 2M acres burned so far this year

- Associated Press

Wildfires have burned more than 2 million acres in California this year, setting a state record even as crews battled dozens of growing blazes in sweltering temperatures Monday that strained the electrical grid and threatened power outages for millions.

California National Guard shows dozens of evacuees are evacuated to safety on a Cal Guard Chinook Saturday, Sept. 5, 2020, after the Creek Fire in central California left them stranded. More than 200 people were airlifted to safety after a fast-moving wildfire trapped them in a popular camping area in California's Sierra National Forest. The California Office of Emergency Services said Black Hawk and Chinook helicopters were used for the rescues that began Saturday night and continued overnight. (California National Guard via AP)

California avoids major power outages as wildfires rage

- Associated Press

Rescuers in military helicopters airlifted 207 people to safety over the weekend after an explosive wildfire trapped them in a popular camping area in California’s Sierra National Forest, one of dozens of fires burning amid record-breaking temperatures that strained the state’s electrical grid and for a time threatened power outages for millions.

The roof of a car factory is left on the sidewalk after a typhoon hit Fukuoka, southwestern Japan, Monday, Sept. 7, 2020. The second powerful typhoon to slam Japan in a week left people injured, damaged buildings, caused blackouts at nearly half a million homes and paralyzed traffic in southern Japanese islands before headed to South Korea. (Kyodo News via AP)

Typhoon lashes South Korea after battering Japanese islands

- Associated Press

A powerful typhoon damaged buildings, flooded roads and knocked out power to thousands of homes in South Korea on Monday after battering islands in southern Japan and injuring dozens of people.

In this April 9, 2010, file photo, a Russian construction worker speaks on a mobile phone in Portovaya Bay some 170 kms (106 miles) north-west from St. Petersburg, Russia, during a ceremony marking the start of Nord Stream pipeline construction. (AP Photo/Dmitry Lovetsky, file)

Navalny poisoning backlash could hand Trump a foreign policy win

- The Washington Times

The furor sparked by the apparent poisoning of Russian opposition leader Alexander Navalny could hand President Trump an unexpected foreign policy win, as Germany weighs whether to pull out of the controversial oil pipeline project with Moscow that Washington has long sought to kill.

Lebanese protesters hold placards during a protest against the Bisri dam project, in the Bisri Valley, 58 kilometers (36 miles) southeast of Beirut, Lebanon, Sunday, March. 10, 2019. The valley of Bisri in Lebanon lies on a green fertile bed, a spot that has cradled civilizations dating as far back as the Bronze Age. Its expansive lands of pine, citrus trees and ancient ruins are about to turn into a controversial mega dam funded by the World Bank. For years now, activists and locals have voiced their opposition to what they describe as not only "an environmental crime," but also a project that mirrors Lebanon's governance crisis. (AP Photo/Mohammed Zaatari)

World Bank-funded dam in Lebanon mirrors governance crisis

- Associated Press

Lebanon’s Bisri Valley lies on a green fertile bed, a spot that has cradled civilizations dating as far back as the Bronze Age. Its expansive lands of pine, citrus trees and ancient ruins are threatened with being submerged by a controversial mega dam funded by the World Bank.

Pope Francis: Use pandemic to give the environment a vital ‘rest’

- Associated Press

The COVID-19 pandemic has shown how the Earth can recover “if we allow it to rest” and must spur people to adopt simpler lifestyles to help a planet “groaning,” under the constant demand for economic growth, Pope Francis said Tuesday.

People survey the damage to their neighborhood on Thursday, Aug. 27, 2020, in Lake Charles, La., in the aftermath of Hurricane Laura. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

Weakened but still dangerous, Laura to pose continued threat

- Associated Press

Remnants of Hurricane Laura unleashed heavy rain and twisters hundreds of miles inland from a path of death and destruction and mangled buildings along the Gulf Coast, and forecasters warn a turn toward the east may spell new dangers for the Eastern Seaboard over the weekend.

Crew members of a shrimp boat called the Sea Lion V prepare as they wait for Hurricane Laura to make landfall, Wednesday, Aug. 26, 2020, in Port Arthur, Texas. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

Laura, now a Category 2 hurricane, still extremely dangerous

- Associated Press

Hurricane Laura pounded the Gulf Coast for hours with ferocious wind, torrential rains and rising seawater as it roared ashore over southwestern Louisiana near the Texas border early Thursday, threatening the lives of people who didn’t evacuate.

Employees of Galveston Furniture cover windows with metal as the island prepares for possible impact from Hurricane Laura, Tuesday, Aug. 25, 2020, in Houston. (Mark Mulligan/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Laura strengthens into ‘extremely dangerous’ Category 4

- Associated Press

Laura strengthened Wednesday into a menacing Category 4 hurricane, raising fears of a 20-foot storm surge that forecasters said would be “unsurvivable” and capable of sinking entire communities. Authorities implored coastal residents of Texas and Louisiana to evacuate and worried that not enough had fled.