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Amazon workers begin to gather in front of the Spheres, participating in the climate strike Friday, Sept. 20, 2019, in Seattle. A wave of climate change protests swept across the globe Friday, with hundreds of thousands of young people sending a message to leaders headed for a U.N. summit: The warming world can't wait for action. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

Amazon, other tech workers join Seattle climate rally

- Associated Press

As they joined a massive climate march led by Seattle school students Wednesday, hundreds of Amazon workers celebrated the company's recent vow to cut its use of fossil fuels but said there's more work to do.

FILE - In this April 11, 2018, file photo, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies before a House Energy and Commerce hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington about the use of Facebook data to target American voters in the 2016 election and data privacy. Zuckerberg will be in Washington Thursday, Sept. 19, 2019, to meet with lawmakers and talk about internet regulation. The company said the meetings are not public and it did not give details on whom Zuckerberg is meeting with and what, exactly, he'll discuss. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

House intel chief says Facebook working on election threats

- Associated Press

The head of the House Intelligence Committee said Friday he has been assured by the CEO of Facebook that the company is working on ways to prevent foreign actors from disrupting next year's elections.

Microsoft: Free Windows 7 security updates for 2020 election

- Associated Press

Microsoft said Friday it will offer free security updates through the 2020 election in the United States - and in other interested democratic countries with national elections next year - for federally certified voting systems running on soon-to-be-outdated Windows 7 software.

FILE - In this Aug. 22, 2019, file photo, signs on a bank of computers tell visitors that the machines are not working at the public library in Wilmer, Texas. Some cybersecurity professionals are concerned that insurance policies designed to limit the damage of ransomware attacks might actually be encouraging hackers. Twenty-two local governments in Texas were hit in August. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez, File)

Payouts from insurance policies may fuel ransomware attacks

- Associated Press

The call came on a Saturday in July delivering grim news: Many of the computer systems serving the government of LaPorte County, Indiana, had been taken hostage with ransomware. The hackers demanded $250,000.

FILE - In this Sept. 16, 2019, file photo Gordon Charlop, center, and Christian Bader work at the New York Stock Exchange. The U.S. stock market opens at 9:30 a.m. EDT on Friday, Sept. 20. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

Fresh US-China trade worries erase early gains for stocks

- Associated Press

Wall Street closed out a volatile week with losses Friday as investors worried that upcoming trade talks aimed at resolving the costly trade war between Washington and Beijing could be in trouble.

Environmental Protection Agency administrator Andrew Wheeler speaks about President Donald Trump's decision to revoke California's authority to set auto mileage standards stricter than those issued by federal regulators, at EPA headquarters in Washington, Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2019. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

AP FACT CHECK: Trump team distortions on fuel economy rules

- Associated Press

President Donald Trump and his team are distorting the facts in explaining the administration's decision to stop California from setting its own emission standards for cars and trucks.

Members of United Auto Workers Local 1590 picket near the GM Martinsburg Parts Distribution Center in Martinsburg, W.Va.,, Thursday, Sept. 19, 2019, during the fourth day of a nationwide work stoppage involving about 49,000 union workers. (Matthew Umstead/The Herald-Mail via AP)

AP Source: GM's offer to UAW would add lower-paying jobs

- Associated Press

A General Motors offer to invest $7 billion in U.S. facilities includes $2 billion from joint ventures and suppliers for new plants that would pay workers less than the top union wage, a person briefed on the matter said.